slake


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slake

1. To add water to quicklime, thereby hydrating it and forming lime putty.
2. To crumble or disintegrate on exposure to air or water.
References in periodicals archive ?
But if Turner was in the business of creating a vision of beauty, then three years earlier the Slake had been the scene of a sight which filled people with horror.
By the time Peter took the photographs in the 1970s the Slake had been disused for many years leaving only rotting posts and half submerged hulks of barges.
The Baa-Baas are an oasis where those wearied by professionalism can slake their thirst
What better way to slake your thirst on the park bench, after a day's happy slapping?
When flows are better, gates to canals or water pipelines may open, giving farmers some of their allotted water--but it frequently hasn't been enough or at the right time to slake the thirst of crops and livestock.
They have no food and will increase the risk of hypothermia if they use ice and snow to slake their thirst.
Above all, the humanity of Plecnik's countless Slovenian buildings, the warmth and richness of his materials and ornament, his individuality, his constant experiment with form, his interest in little things and his profound Catholic faith, slake the thirst of architects seeking for sincerity outside the worn-out orthodoxies.
Artist and photographer Peter Dixon discovered a set of forgotten negatives when he moved house last year, showing Jarrow Slake in the 1970s.
He won the North East regional final and slakes his thirst at The Slake in West Cornforth.
After his hanging, during the 1832 miners' strike in the coalfields of Durham and Northumberland, Jobling's dead body was displayed on a gibbet at Jarrow Slake in South Tyneside for six weeks.
A COMPANY run by two former Huddersfield University students supplied beer to slake the thirst of performers at the Live8 concert in Edinburgh.
But around 1900, state bureaucrats decided that the river feeding Owens Lake was better used to slake the thirst of the growing population of Los Angeles.