sledge

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sledge:

see sledsled,
vehicle that moves by sliding. A sledge is typically a heavier, load-carrying sled drawn by a horse or dog, while a sleigh is a partially enclosed horse-drawn vehicle with runners that has seats for passengers.
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sledgehammer, sledge

A large hammer having two faces; weighs up to 100 lb (45 kg); grasped with both hands.

sledge

1 (esp US and Canadian), sled
1. a vehicle mounted on runners, drawn by horses or dogs, for transporting people or goods, esp over snow
2. a light wooden frame used, esp by children, for sliding over snow; toboggan
3. NZ a farm vehicle mounted on runners, for use on rough or muddy ground

sledge

2
an insult aimed at another player during a game of cricket
References in classic literature ?
The only sledge left out of six was not very far behind them, and Pavel's middle horse was failing.
Pavel knocked him over the side of the sledge and threw the girl after him.
The prairie, across which the sledge was moving in a straight line, was as flat as a sea.
The sledge slid along in the midst of a plaintively intense melody.
She took a seat in the sledge, and did not utter a word all the way home.
said Nikita, and stopping the sledge he picked up the master's pale thin little son, radiant with joy, and drove out into the road.
he exclaimed when he saw his little son in the sledge.
And she put him in the sledge beside her, wrapped the fur round him, and he felt as though he were sinking in a snow-wreath.
It was there tied to one of the white chickens, who flew along with it on his back behind the large sledge.
At daybreak they made their way to the spot which they knew the sledge must pass.
Then she called to her husband: 'Old man, yoke the horses at once into the sledge, and take my daughter to the same field and leave her on the same spot exactly; 'and so the old man took the girl and left her beneath the same tree where he had parted from his daughter.
Denis's commercial instinct compelled him to aver on oath that what Eady's store could not produce would never be found at the widow Homan's; but Ethan, heedless of this boast, had already climbed to the sledge and was driving on to the rival establishment.