Smallness


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

Smallness

See also Dwarfism.
Alice
nibbles a magic cake to become a pygmy. [Br. Lit.: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland]
Alphonse
petite page to Mr. Wititterly. [Br. Lit.: Nicholas Nickleby]
Andorra
small state of 191 square miles, between France and Spain. [Eur. Hist.: NCE, 100]
Anon, Mr
. a deformed and hunchbacked midget. [Br. Lit.: Memoirs of a Midget, Magill I, 577–579]
hop-o’-my-thumb
generic term for a midget or dwarf. [Folklore: Brewer Dictionary, 544]
Liechtenstein
central European principality, comprising 65 square miles. [Eur. Hist.: NCE, 1578]
Lilliputians
race of pygmies living in fictitious kingdom of Lilliput. [Br. Lit.: Gulliver’s Travels]
Little Tich
midget music-hall comedian of late 1800s. [Br. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1082]
Luxembourg
duchy of 999 square miles in Western Europe. [Eur. Hist.: NCE, 1632]
Miss M
. perfectly formed midget leads the pleasant social life of a young lady but disappears mysteriously. [Br. Lit.: Walter de la Mare Memoirs of a Midget in Magill I, 577]
Mowcher, Miss
kindhearted hairdresser of small stature. [Br. Lit.: David Copperfield]
Pepin the Short
first Frankish king; progenitor of Carolingian dynasty. [Eur. Hist.: Bishop, 20, 25]
Quilp, Daniel
small man with giant head and face. [Br. Lit.: Old Curiosity Shop]
Rhode Island
smallest of the fifty states; nicknamed “Little Rhodie.” [Am. Hist.: NCE, 2315]
Stareleigh
Justice “a most particularly short man.” [Br. Lit.: Pickwick Papers]
Thumb, Tom
(1838–1883) stage name for the midget, Charles Sherwood Stratton. [Am. Hist.: Benét, 1016]
Thumbelina
tiny girl, rescued by a swallow, marries the tiny king of the Angels of the Flowers. [Dan. Lit.: Andersen’s Fairy Tales]
Zacchaeus
little man took to tree to see Christ. [N.T.: Luke 19:3–4]
References in periodicals archive ?
MNE hierarchy can also lead to a country hierarchy where smallness is then considered as a liability (see Pitelis for an extensive analysis).
Specifically, the FIST values contend that for military program management and technology development, speed is good, lower costs are good, simplicity is good, and smallness is good.
Despite the relative smallness of the building, its design features provide advantages.
When your company reaches its 50th birthday--if it hasn't already--I hope it finds the right degree of bigness or smallness to thrive.
Microcoria is the medical term used to describe persistent smallness of the pupil that may be present at birth or develop over the years.
The cab stops at the end of the ride, Hitch gets out, and, turning to the father--and we see this from an immense distance, as befits the smallness and lostness of the erring father who must now be condemned to the fallout from his actions--informs him that the story is not a "suspense story" at all, but rather a Greek tragedy.
If there are any slight problems to be heard, these are merely the comparative smallness of the orchestra and of the hall itself (compared to recordings of Martinu from the Rudolfinum).
Toshiba's compact electronics components broke the world's record in terms of smallness for the second straight year, as its 0.
Almost entirely a cappella, Medulla is the logical next step after the smallness of Vespertine.
But the one I like the most is when he talked about the threat that lawyers pose to "small businesses" The line won loud applause, but, if you've ever run a small business, as I did here for 32 years, you know that your smallness is a lovely deterrent to the litigious.
PERHAPS IT WAS THAT SENSE OF smallness or sameness that drove medieval Christians to make pilgrimages to the great churches of Europe, to take to the road and visit the shrines of saints in basilicas scattered from England to Italy.
13) Wardin suggested that the smallness of the SDB group might be traced to unfair connections made between this group and the Seventh Day Adventists who penetrated the Northwest in the 1870s.