smear

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smear

a preparation of blood, secretions, etc., smeared onto a glass slide for examination under a microscope

smear

[smir]
(biology)
A preparation for microscopic examination made by spreading a drop of fluid, such as blood, across a slide and using the edge of another slide to leave a uniform film.
(electronics)
A television-picture defect in which objects appear to be extended horizontally beyond their normal boundaries in a blurred or smeared manner; one cause is excessive attenuation of high video frequencies in the television receiver.
References in periodicals archive ?
Her eyes are red and smeary while her greasy hair appears to have been styled with a pork chop.
Then his face convulsed into a pink and smeary mass.
If you've seen my face after I've thrown on eyeliner in a rush while two kids run amok, you will know this smeary gel is entirely unnecessary.
Make sure the washer bottle is full; a smeary windscreen is not only annoying, it is dangerous.
Scans of soft tissues like the breast produced smeary images of little value.
is is the stu of fairytales to those of us more adept at rubbing spy holes through smeary windscreens than bu[euro]ng bodywork until it gleams.
Wiper blades Smeary windscreens caused by cracked and worn rubber blades hinder visibility both in wet and bright conditions.
The heating was on, burning up my left leg like a laptop PC, and the window was steamed up, revealing smeary libels written long ago.
The chase scenes are ugly, smeary, low-res messes that resemble video from a bargain-brand cellphone.
Here incarnated in porcelain with lustre glaze, the smeary, blotchy, bubbly surfaces suggest abstract painting, the damage of time or some untoward chemical experiment.
The Milky Way galaxy appears as a smeary streak to creatures on Earth because we're looking at it from the inside of its disk.
And so the carpet in the Terrace Brasserie, where we had lunch, needed a decent vacuum and the brass plate on the gents' loo needed buffing to remove the smeary marks left by a thousand fingers.