sneezeweed


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Related to sneezeweed: bitter sneezeweed

sneezeweed,

name for any plant of the genus Helenium, American meadow and field herbs of the family Asteraceae (asteraster
[Gr.,=star], common name for the Asteraceae (Compositae), the aster family, in North America, name for plants of the genus Aster, sometimes called wild asters, and for a related plant more correctly called China aster (Callistephus chinensis
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 family), with daisylike heads of yellow (or occasionally purple) flowers. A few of the more attractive sneezeweeds are cultivated in gardens, such as varieties of H. autumnale, the most common species of E North America. The bitter sap of some sneezeweeds (e.g., H. tenuifolium, a Southern plant also called bitterweed) imparts a disagreeable flavor to the milk of cows that graze on them. Sneezeweeds are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Asterales, family Asteraceae.
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sneezeweed

sneezeweed

Yellow daisy-like flowers with globular middle, angled stems. Sometimes called “Swamp Sunflower” because it likes to grow near water in sand. Tea made from flowers used for intestinal worms. Contains a strong anti-cancer lactone recognized by National Cancer Institute. Ok for humans, but too strong (poisonous) for animals, worms and insects. Keep away from grazing animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
One vulnerable species, a plant called the Virginia sneezeweed (Helenium virginicum), was known only from Virginia until a population was discovered in Missouri in 1960.
Rimer is the Natural History Regional Biologist for the Missouri Department of Conservation's Ozark Region and the State Recovery Leader for Virginia Sneezeweed (Rhonda.
Waves and waves of lobelia, lupine, New Jersey tea, Turk's-cap, yellow star, pasture rose, purple milkwort, sneezeweed, purple avens, Ohio spiderwort, wild bergamot, fringed gentian, black-eyed susan, golden alexanders, purple coneflower, blue flag, cardinal flower, Maximilian sunflower, and butterfly weed bloom and swing as their fragrance is lost in the gusty wind.
Sneezeweed, Helenium autumnale, is a recorded host (Scott 1985) and was present in the area.
Which is where the legend comes unstuck since heleniums are native to North America not Greece and who would dare suggest that a plant whose common name is sneezeweed could possibly be connected to such a beauty.
Sneezeweed or helenium autumnale are tall plants which go full tilt in mid-September until the frosts.
Virginia Sneezeweed (Helenium virginicum) This perennial in the aster family is restricted to seasonally inundated sinkhole ponds and meadows within Augusta and Rockingham counties in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley.