Sod


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sod

a piece of grass-covered surface soil held together by the roots of the grass; turf

sod

A thin block of grass held by its roots, usually used for turf and lawns, but can be used as a temporary building material. Like brick, sod is cut and laid in regular block shapes. The walls of a sod building are usually protected with a layer of stucco or wood panels. See also: Biomaterials

Sod

 

the surface layer of soil with interwoven live and dead roots, runners, and rhizomes of perennial grasses. Sod contains a large amount of organic matter. It is most developed in virgin steppes and in meadows, where it serves as an effective means of holding and absorbing moisture. The destruction of sod in plowing or by grazing often causes soil erosion. Sod protects the slopes of earthen structures from water and wind erosion. The best means of tilling sod on turfy arable soils is by plowing with plows having skim colters; the quality of the plowing is improved by preliminary disking. Turfy marshy soils are cultivated with rotary tillers or plows, followed by harrowing.


Sod

 

pieces of turf, cut mostly in rectangular sections. It is used for quickly grassing areas of ground not covered with vegetation, for strengthening slopes of dams and railroad beds, and for other purposes, such as for lawns and for repairing lawns when laying out public gardens.

sod

The upper layer of soil covered by grass and containing the grass roots.
References in classic literature ?
It seemed as if the grass were about to run over them, and over the plum-patch behind the sod chicken-house.
The crew was mostly Cork an' Kerry men, barrin' one Marylander that wanted to go back, but they called him a mutineer, an' they ran the ould Manila into Skibbereen, an' they had an illigant time visitin' around with frinds on the ould sod fer a week.
Looking over the damp sod in the direction of the sun, a glistening ripple of gossamer webs was visible to their eyes under the luminary, like the track of moonlight on the sea.
Occasional areas of firm sod gave us intervals of rest from the arduous labor of traversing this gorgeous, twilight swamp, and it was upon one of these that I finally decided to make camp for the night which my chronometer warned me would soon be upon us.
said the sacked nun, with a strange accent; "and will you also make a little for the poor little one who has been beneath the sod for these fifteen years?
He shall not be hanged tomorrow day," cried Robin; "or, if he be, full many a one shall gnaw the sod, and many shall have cause to cry Alack-a-day
She probably imagined that she was thinking about the Aids and their missionary box and the new carpet for the vestry room, but under these reflections was a harmonious consciousness of red fields smoking into pale-purply mists in the declining sun, of long, sharp-pointed fir shadows falling over the meadow beyond the brook, of still, crimson-budded maples around a mirrorlike wood pool, of a wakening in the world and a stir of hidden pulses under the gray sod.
Again there was a silence, while Captain Jim kept a passing tryst with visitants Anne and Gilbert could not see--the folks who had sat with him around that fireplace in the vanished years, with mirth and bridal joy shining in eyes long since closed forever under churchyard sod or heaving leagues of sea.
A sod covers his gentle form, and he knows no pain.
That was what poor old Peter himself had expected; having often, in imagination, looked up through the sods above him, and, unobstructed by.
The earth shook beneath their feet and the sky grew dark with flying sods of earth and with flecks of foam.
Benassis lies; it is being covered now with green sods, and every one is helping them.