Sod

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sod

a piece of grass-covered surface soil held together by the roots of the grass; turf

sod

A thin block of grass held by its roots, usually used for turf and lawns, but can be used as a temporary building material. Like brick, sod is cut and laid in regular block shapes. The walls of a sod building are usually protected with a layer of stucco or wood panels. See also: Biomaterials

Sod

 

the surface layer of soil with interwoven live and dead roots, runners, and rhizomes of perennial grasses. Sod contains a large amount of organic matter. It is most developed in virgin steppes and in meadows, where it serves as an effective means of holding and absorbing moisture. The destruction of sod in plowing or by grazing often causes soil erosion. Sod protects the slopes of earthen structures from water and wind erosion. The best means of tilling sod on turfy arable soils is by plowing with plows having skim colters; the quality of the plowing is improved by preliminary disking. Turfy marshy soils are cultivated with rotary tillers or plows, followed by harrowing.


Sod

 

pieces of turf, cut mostly in rectangular sections. It is used for quickly grassing areas of ground not covered with vegetation, for strengthening slopes of dams and railroad beds, and for other purposes, such as for lawns and for repairing lawns when laying out public gardens.

sod

The upper layer of soil covered by grass and containing the grass roots.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Dolly Sods Wilderness Area protects only one-third of these open highlands.
The Minnesota sod populations were lowest in reproductive and vegetative forage yield and plant diameter (Table 3).
Clones collected from fence and sod habitats did not differ in overall phenotype; on the whole, for 1500 clones, neither habitat resulted in unique phenotypes which were not present in the other habitat (Fig.
First, the founder population for each cemetery likely gave rise to both fence and sod populations at that site.
New genotypes probably do not arise easily or frequently within either habitat, with seedling recruitment in a dense and vigorous sod as the most likely mechanism for their introduction.
The large phenotypic differences between fence and sod populations and their generally consistent level across cemeteries (Table 3; Fig.
Conversely, the 30 sod populations tended to be more phenotypically distinct from each other compared with the fence populations, with a maximum NPD of 5.
PGR-induced PE increases before sod harvest may offer protection of photosystem II during sod heat treatment and during transplantation (Table 1; Zhang and Schmidt, 2000a).
The technique used in this study simulates a type of stress (high temperature and dark environment) that sod experiences during transport periods in the summer months.
sod before harvest as influenced by plant growth regulators (PGRs).
Sod production characteristics of turf-type Buchloe dactyloides.
Biostimulator enhancement of Kentucky bluegrass sod.