solder


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solder

(sŏd`ər), metal alloy used in the molten state as a metallic binder. The type of solder to be used is determined by the metals to be united. Soft solders are commonly composed of lead and tin and have low melting points. Hard solders (i.e., silver solders) have high melting points and are suited for use with ferrous and high-melting-point nonferrous alloys. Areas to be soldered are cleaned and coated with a flux (such as hydrochloric acid or borax) to prevent oxides from separating the solder from the surface. When brass is used in the solder or when brass surfaces are to be joined, the process is known as brazing, though the name is sometimes applied also to other hard soldering.

Solder

 

a metal or alloy that is introduced into the gap between combinable parts or that is formed between combinable parts as a result of diffusion during soldering. Solder has a lower melting point than soldered materials. The melting point of a solder is one of its most important characteristics and determines the soldering method and equipment to be used and the strength of the joint to be formed. The higher the melting point of a solder, the greater its strength and the strength of the soldered joint over the entire operational temperature range.

Solder must sufficiently wet the materials to be soldered and must flow over these materials in such a way as to cover all solderable gaps. Tight, corrosion-resistant joints are thus formed. Thermal expansion coefficients for both the solder and the soldered material should not differ markedly. In special cases, solders are required to be resistant to heat, acids, and alkalies. They should also be good electrical conductors.

The most common solders contain Sn, Pb, Cu, Ag, Ni, Zn, or Al. Monolithic, powdered, laminated, and self-fluxing solders are differentiated according to performance.

V. P. FROLOV

solder

[′säd·ər]
(metallurgy)
To join by means of solder.
An alloy, such as of zinc and copper, or of tin and lead, used when melted to join metallic surfaces.

solder

An alloy, usually having a lead or tin base, which is used to join metals by fusion; has a melting point which does not exceed 800°F (427°C).

solder

an alloy for joining two metal surfaces by melting the alloy so that it forms a thin layer between the surfaces. Soft solders are alloys of lead and tin; brazing solders are alloys of copper and zinc

solder

Pronounced "sod-er." A metal alloy used to bond other metals together. Tin and lead are used in "soft" solders, which melt rather easily. The more tin, the harder the solder, and the higher the temperature required. Copper and zinc are used in "hard" soldering, or brazing, which requires considerably more heat to melt. See braze, reflow and wave soldering.
References in periodicals archive ?
The only practical solution is to manually add solder to the individual solder joint, post-reflow, without running the entire PCB through another thermal cycle.
This 2015 solder paste market report focuses on global major leading industry players providing information such as company profiles, product picture and specification, capacity production, price, cost, production value and contact information.
In addition to a very low profile, the SolderRight one-piece crimp solder terminal includes unique design features such as multiple terminal and wire sizes, solder pins positioned between insulation and conductor crimps, and twin solder pins.
These molecules of copper and tin that occur at the interface of the copper and solder are called intermetallics (FIGURE 3).
For flux-free soldering, with a mechanical removing of oxides, only the Sn6Ag4TiCe solder is destined (Kolenak, 2005; Kolenak 2011).
Nevertheless, it was recognized that in run 2, the solder was flowing incorrectly.
Then, the group added solder to serve as hinges along all the edges of each of the squares.
In contrast, mechanical stress does not play a role so that weakly adhesive peelable solder masks can be used.
The main approach to replacing lead in solder has been to look for other metals as substitutes.
The High Temperature Fatigue Resistant Solder Project was summarized in an invited article in Advanced Materials and Processes, April 2001, written by NIST staff.
The Council has passed legislation that has gradually and effectively reduced the uses for leaded solders .
8 Influence of Microstructure on Creep and High Strain Rate Fracture of Sn-Ag-Based Solder Joints