solitary

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solitary

1. (of animals) not living in organized colonies or large groups
2. (of flowers) growing singly
3. Informal short for solitary confinement
References in periodicals archive ?
The narrative frame speaks of painful loss, but images of solitariness, separation from joy, isolation, and longing are subverted by imputed motives of greed, juxtaposed with evil community, and denied heavenly consolation.
That Emma's story begins the afternoon of the Westons' wedding day contrasts her solitariness with their marriage.
Levinas had already intuited the pathway Western society would take and, by the beginning of the second half of the twentieth-century, he was proposing that only the ethical relation permits us to overcome the isolation and solitariness of Being.
Blum's selective quotation tempers the wonder and highlights the solitariness.
The first poem deals with solitariness, and is discussed in detail below.
Robinson has created a balladlike story about two lost people who, after years of stoic solitariness, unexpectedly find love--not the sudden, transformative passion of romantic movies and novels but a hard-won trust and tenderness that grow slowly over time.
Of such transactions Keen points to Hardy's journey into solitariness, moving "towards an embrace of nescience (the condition of not knowing) and affirming his monist perspective on the universe's organization" (104).
36) Although Benwick clearly enjoys oral recitation, and Anne, "repeating" verses "to herself" (114), may also be speaking sotto voce, her own solitariness and his residence among companions with "no concern in" literary subjects (129) imply that they are primarily silent readers who indulge their habits alone--the better to hear the words on the page.
Gracie's solitariness is well conveyed; the mystery of the forest at night, its stillness and coldness, can be felt; and the explosions of the fireworks, presumably on bonfire night, are suitably startling.
Beyond a sense of art's nihilistic solitariness and the over-intellectualisation of art movements, we return to the poetic intimacy of clay vessels and to a grassroots Gulgong experience that had been nurtured.
Let us say, then, that Thoreau is comfortable with his solitariness, and that he is not troubled by various losses.