solstices


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solstices

(sol -stiss-iz)
1. (solstitial points) the two points that lie on the ecliptic midway between the vernal and autumnal equinoxes and at which the Sun, in its apparent annual motion, is at its greatest angular distance (23½°) north or south of the celestial equator.
2. The times at which the Sun reaches these points, on about June 21 and Dec. 22; the hours of daylight or of darkness are then at a maximum.
References in periodicals archive ?
The site was likely originally a spot for worshiping the solstices, (http://www.
THE summer solstice has long been a day of celebration because it marks the start of astronomical summer and is the longest day of the year in terms of daylight.
London: Gardens of the famed Taj Mahal, one of the seven wonders of the world, align perfectly with the rising and setting sun during the summer and winter solstices, according to new research.
However, at the time of the Solstices, both the Summer Solstice around the July 22 and the December Winter Solstice, the noontime height of the Sun in the sky appears constant for a few days before and after the Solstice.
There are two solstices each year when the sun appears to reach its most northerly or southerly point in the sky before "stopping" and changing direction.
The ancient Semites were known for an interest in the equinoxes --the major Hebrew festivals came at the equinoxes, for example--but this would be the first evidence of an interest in the solstices.
Between these equinoxes, the summer and winter solstices occur when one hemisphere is tilted closest and farthest toward the sun, respectively.
There are two solstices each year: one in winter, and one in summer.
Scientifically speaking, the two solstices in a year are the days during which the earth's tilt towards the sun is the most extreme.