soot

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soot,

black or dull brown deposit of fine powder resulting from incomplete combustion of fuel of high carbon content, e.g., coal, wood, and oil. It consists chiefly of amorphous carbon and tarry substances that cause it to adhere to surfaces. Soot obtained from coal also contains sulfur and ammonia. See carbon blackcarbon black,
mixture of partially burned hydrocarbons. Carbon black is produced by partial combustion of natural gas. It is used as a black pigment for inks and paints, and is used in large amounts by the tire industry in the production of vulcanized rubber.
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soot

[su̇t]
(materials)
Impure black carbon with oily compounds obtained from the incomplete combustion of resinous materials, oils, wood, or coal.

soot

finely divided carbon deposited from flames during the incomplete combustion of organic substances such as coal
References in periodicals archive ?
Soot is primarily carbon-based chemical by-products formed from incompletely combusted or uncombusted hydrocarbon-based fuels.
They are in the earliest stages of a new project they believe will lead to the creation of a suite of synthetic soot particles that could allow for improved calibration of the analytical instruments used to measure PM.
Jacobson says worldwide soot production is on the order of 7-10 billion kilograms annually.
Soot has been found at the South Pole, with no major emission source for thousands of kilometers.
Jacobson says soot can start out as simple black carbon, but can serve as a collection/mixing point for a wide range of other chemicals, including sulfates and nitrates--soot not only serves as a platform where these compounds can mix with one another, but also combines with them to form different substances.
A study by scientists at the research organization SRI International, published in volume 24, issue 4 (1997), of Geophysical Research Letters, showed that soot particles are able to catalyze a variety of chemical reactions that do not occur in their absence.
We prepared BSDE for cell culture studies by dissolving the butadiene soot in DMSO and then membrane-filtered it (0.
We examined toluene and DMSO extracts of butadiene soot by probe distillation/electron impact in a single quadrapole mass spectrometer (PDMS; Shimadzu Instruments, Columbia, MD).
We examined dry soot and extracts for free radical signals using a Model 109 Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectrometer (ESR; Varian Instruments, Palo Alto, CA).
We extracted soot solids (20 mg) in DMSO and clarified them by centrifugation.
Butadiene soot was bubbled into the spin-trap solution immediately after generation under vacuum.
Soot yields varied with fuel flow rate and ranged from 0.