sooty mold


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Related to sooty mold: Mealybugs

sooty mold

[′su̇d·ē ′mōld]
(mycology)
Ascomycetous fungi of the family Capnodiaceae, with dark mycelium and conidia.
(plant pathology)
A plant disease, common on Citrus species, characterized by a dense velvety layer of a sooty mold on exposed parts of the plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some other potential food sources also proved to be suitable, especially dead Surinam cockroaches, earthworms, and sooty mold (Fig.
Nevertheless, it is important to point out the growth of sooty mold, covering close to 100% of the surface of bottom leaves, only occurred in the treatment without application of insecticides in the second trial, when the whitefly population was higher.
As inefficient insect feeders, sap falls to objects below and is typically colonized by sooty mold fungi that turn the objects black.
Black sooty mold fungus may cover parts of the plant; heavily infested twigs and branches may die.
The mealybugs damaged cocoa shoots, with development of sooty mold on young (6 mo to 2 yr old) (Figs.
Either you actually see them or you observe their cast-off skins (seen as small white bits of matter) or the shiny, sticky "honeydew' is seen, or as a black sooty mold when a particular fungus colonizes the sugar-rich honeydew.
Early this summer I noticed that certain shoots, planted last fall, had suddenly turned black, apparently the victim of sooty mold fungus.
As it builds up on leaves, a heavy black fungus called sooty mold soon proliferates.
They excrete excess sap as a sticky, clear honeydew, coating the leaves and providing a growing ground for unsightly sooty mold.
Furthermore, the its honeydew provides a substrate for the development of sooty mold fungi and decreases the quality of fruits and ornamental plants (Williams 1985; Franco et al.
The trees also become blackened with a fungus called sooty mold as a result.
Adding insult to injury, it leaves behind a sugary substance that makes an ideal growth medium for sooty mold on host plants.