mute

(redirected from sordino)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

mute

(myo͞ot), in music, device designed to diminish uniformly the loudness of a musical instrument. For example, a trumpet mute is cone-shaped and fits into the instrument's bell, and a violin mute is a wooden or rubber clamp that can be attached to the bridge.

Mute

 

a device on musical instruments that muffles the sound and partially alters the timbre. Mutes are used principally with bowed stringed instruments, horns, and trumpets. In bowed stringed instruments, they consist of a clamp made of hard wood, metal, or plastic placed over the top of the bridge. In trumpets and horns, they are a pear-shaped vessel, usually made of aluminum with a layer of cork around the edges, which fits into the bell of the instrument. In the piano, the function of the mute is fulfilled by the left (soft) pedal.

mute

A mortised rubber silencer for a door.

mute

1
1. unable to speak; dumb
2. Law (of a person arraigned on indictment) refusing to answer a charge
3. a person who is unable to speak
4. Law a person who refuses to plead when arraigned on indictment for an offence
5. any of various devices used to soften the tone of stringed or brass instruments
6. an actor in a dumb show

mute

2 Archaic
birds' faeces
References in periodicals archive ?
But on Sunday he gave a more professional performance and saw out the 1m4f well, winning by a length and a quarter and a neck from outsiders in Sordino and Toughness Danon.
Wiener Walzer, a son of Dynaformer, battled on to score by a length and a quarter from Sordino, Toughness Danon and Eliot, who were divided by two necks.
The senza sordino markings at the beginning of the Sinfonia's 3/4 section, for example, printed in roman typeface in the violins but italic in the v iola, are not present in any of the parts in source A, although they do make sense given the forte added at this point by Georg Michael.
Chapter 6 (with the exception of a final section on improvisation that would more appropriately have been included in chapter 8) concerns "special effects": dynamics, harmonics, pizzicato, scordatura, con sordino, sul ponticello, vibrato, and portamento; of these, the last two differ from the others in that they are usually treated as ornaments in the methods.