Sparidae

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Sparidae

[′spar·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A family of perciform fishes in the suborder Percoidei, including the porgies.

Sparidae

 

(porgies), a family of fishes of the order Perciformes. The tall, laterally compressed body is rounded or elongate; it ranges in length from 10 cm to 1.5 m. The back is arched. The coloration is bright and varied. The mouth is in the form of a straight slit; the teeth are numerous and of various shapes, depending on the mode of feeding (predacious, planktivorous, herbivorous). There is a single dorsal fin; its anterior rays are powerful spines that are retractible into a groove on the back.

There are more than 30 genera of porgies, distributed in the temperate and tropical waters of the world ocean. The fishes live close to shore in shallow bays and inlets; they sometimes enter the mouth of rivers. Porgies are only rarely encountered far offshore. Nine species, from eight genera, are found in the waters of the USSR (Black Sea, Sea of Azov, Sea of Japan). The species include representatives of the genera Dentex, Pagrus, and Diplodus. All porgies are hermaphroditic. Most species are commercially valuable.

REFERENCES

Svetovidov, A. N. Ryby Chernogo moria. Moscow-Leningrad, 1964.
Nikol’skii, G. V. Chastnaia ikhtiologiia, 3rd ed. Moscow, 1971.
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Investigations into the larval rearing of two South African sparid species.
Gametogenesis was similar to that described for other late gonochoristic sparids e.
Late gonochorism, protandry, protogyny, and hermaphroditism are the recognized reproductive styles of sparids (Smale, 1988; Buxton and Garratt, 1990).
Pair-spawning sparids such as Chrysoblephus laticeps have low male GSI ([+ or -] 10% of female) during the spawning season (Buxton, 1990).
Spatio-temporal variability in growth of juvenile sparid fisbes from the Mediterranean littoral zone.
butcheri could be used for aging this sparid when there were six or less opaque zones present (Fig.
As pointed out by Blaber (1974) during his study of another sparid, Rhabdosargus holubi, which likewise ingests a large amount of algal material, the volume of digestible material consumed is small.
As with other sparids, a narrow opaque zone is laid down in the otoliths of A.