Sparidae

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Sparidae

[′spar·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A family of perciform fishes in the suborder Percoidei, including the porgies.

Sparidae

 

(porgies), a family of fishes of the order Perciformes. The tall, laterally compressed body is rounded or elongate; it ranges in length from 10 cm to 1.5 m. The back is arched. The coloration is bright and varied. The mouth is in the form of a straight slit; the teeth are numerous and of various shapes, depending on the mode of feeding (predacious, planktivorous, herbivorous). There is a single dorsal fin; its anterior rays are powerful spines that are retractible into a groove on the back.

There are more than 30 genera of porgies, distributed in the temperate and tropical waters of the world ocean. The fishes live close to shore in shallow bays and inlets; they sometimes enter the mouth of rivers. Porgies are only rarely encountered far offshore. Nine species, from eight genera, are found in the waters of the USSR (Black Sea, Sea of Azov, Sea of Japan). The species include representatives of the genera Dentex, Pagrus, and Diplodus. All porgies are hermaphroditic. Most species are commercially valuable.

REFERENCES

Svetovidov, A. N. Ryby Chernogo moria. Moscow-Leningrad, 1964.
Nikol’skii, G. V. Chastnaia ikhtiologiia, 3rd ed. Moscow, 1971.
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References in periodicals archive ?
1999) Spatio temporal variability in growth of juvenile sparid fishes from Mediterranean littoral zone.
El Maghraby AM, Botros GA (1981) Maturation, spawning and fecundity of two sparid fish Diplodus sargus L and Diplodus vulgaris, Geoffer in the Egyptian Mediterranean waters.
In the field these factors generally coincide because the dominant sparid fishes in our system (including both Diplodus holbrooki and Lagodon rhomboides) feed heavily on both amphipods (Adams 1976b, Nelson 1979b, Stoner 1980a, Darcy 1985a, b) and red and green algae (Hay 1986, Hay et al.
laticeps), both sparids, were found in areas open than in areas closed to fishing--a finding attributed to selective removal of larger size classes (Buxton, 1993).
Also, given the large number of exploited protogynous species among sparids and many other families, and the need to predict the effects of fishing, it is important to determine whether such behavior-related selectivity characterizes most fishes with this mating system or whether it is restricted to certain serranids.
RemarksIn Pakistan, all sparid fishes are commercially important, including Sparidentex species, and fetch high prices in the lCal fish markets at Karachi.
The carpenter seabream (Argyrozona argyrozona), known as "carpenter" regionally, is an endemic South African sparid found between St Helena Bay and KwaZulu-Natal (Fig.
1992; Nichol and Acuna, 2001), only one attempt has apparently been made to estimate the annual fecundity of wild populations of this sparid (El-Agamy, 1989).
Spatio-temporal variability in growth of juvenile sparid fisbes from the Mediterranean littoral zone.
The pinfish (Lagodon rhomboides) is an ecologically important sparid that inhabits estuarine and offshore waters of the United States from Massachusetts to Texas (Darcy, 1985).
The red porgy, a protogynous sparid also known as silver snapper and pink snapper, associates with reefs and is commonly found over irregular and low-profile hard bottoms at depths between about 20 and 200 m (Manooch and Hassler, 1978).
Indeed, there is good evidence that the abundance of this sparid in the Blackwood River Estuary in southwestern Australia declined markedly between the 1970s and 1990s as a result of a combination of commercial and recreational fishing activities (see Valesini et al.