specimen

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specimen

1. Med a sample of tissue, blood, urine, etc., taken for diagnostic examination or evaluation
2. the whole or a part of an organism, plant, rock, etc., collected and preserved as an example of its class, species, etc.

Specimen

 

a sample, usually metal, that may be studied macro-scopically (in macrosections) or microscopically (in microsections). Preparation of a specimen entails grinding the flat surface of a sample and, if microsections are to be examined, polishing the surface. The surface is then etched with chemical reagents or heated in a gaseous atmosphere or in a vacuum. Selective etching and evaporation occur as a result of the differences in the physi-cochemical properties both of the grains of different phases as well as of the different grain-boundary regions. This leads to the formation of a macrorelief, which is visible to the unaided eye, or a microrelief, which must be examined with a microscope.

specimen

[′spes·ə·mən]
(science and technology)
An item representative of others in the same class or group.
A sample selected for testing, examination, or display.
References in periodicals archive ?
Methodology: This was a retrospective study conducted from January 2011 to December 2015 on 450 specimens of transurethral prostatectomy performed for benign prostate hyperplasia.
A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, 3rd Edition
At SKMC, pediatric specimens are currently collected into a capillary blood collection microtube, obtained mainly from infants and newborns.
11] compared the performance of the structural timber in compression parallel and small clear specimens where he states that the compression strength of the structural specimen value has a good agreement between the compression strength provided in the DNA-ECS (Portuguese Nationally Determined Parameters of Eurocode 5) based on the small clear specimen.
To reduce the risk of error, American Association of Blood Banks standards require that patient blood sample tubes have affixed to them labels bearing at least 2 unique patient identifiers and the dates on which specimens were collected.
RT-PCR was routinely performed on urine, serum, or saliva specimens collected within 21 days of symptom onset.
All remaining incidents were compared against the total numbers of specimens documented on the intra-operative Patient Information Management System and destined for the histology department, in order to establish the denominator and true significance of the issue (Table 1).
These flaws during collection/ transport of specimens to the lab if taken care of can go a long way in tremendously improving the test results helping in better diagnosis and treatment decisions.
I have recently taken an interest in Stauromedusae, having collected two single specimens over the last 10 years.
These factors, with a concomitant increase in disposable income and available leisure time for people in wealthier countries, have combined to call forth quantities of specimens unimaginable to collectors of a century ago.
Issues common to all clinical specimens submitted for microbiological testing include not only proper identification, but also collection techniques that maximize recovery of microbiological pathogens and minimize contamination.
When hemolyzed specimens are analyzed, the accuracy and reliability of test results are drawn into question.