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Related to sperm count: sperm motility

count

1
1. the act of counting or reckoning
2. the number reached by counting; sum
3. Law a paragraph in an indictment containing a distinct and separate charge
4. Physics the total number of photons or ionized particles detected by a counter
5. Boxing Wrestling the act of telling off a number of seconds by the referee, as when a boxer has been knocked down or a wrestler pinned by his opponent
6. out for the count Boxing knocked out and unable to continue after a count of ten by the referee
7. take the count Boxing to be unable to continue after a count of ten

count

2
1. a nobleman in any of various European countries having a rank corresponding to that of a British earl
2. any of various officials in the late Roman Empire and under various Germanic kings in the early Middle Ages
3. a man who has received an honour (papal knighthood) from the Pope in recognition of good deeds, achievements, etc.

Count

 

(Russian, graf; from German Graf), in Western Europe during the early Middle Ages, a royal servitor. Beginning in the second half of the sixth century, a count in the Frankish state possessed his own district—the county—with judicial, administrative, and military authority. Gradually the post of count became hereditary. In the period of feudal disintegration, the count was a feudal sovereign; then, at the end of this period, he became a high aristocrat. The title of count is maintained to this day in most European countries with a monarchical form of government.

In Russia the title of graf was introduced in the 18th century by Peter I and was abolished in 1917.

count

[kau̇nt]
(aerospace engineering)
To proceed from one point to another in a countdown or plus count, normally by calling a number to signify the point reached.
To proceed in a countdown, for example, T minus 90 and counting.
(chemistry)
An ionizing event.
(design engineering)
The number of openings per linear inch in a wire cloth.
(mathematics)
To name a set of consecutive positive integers in order of size, usually starting with 1.
To associate consecutive positive integers, starting with 1, with the members of a finite set in order to determine the cardinal number of the set.
(nucleonics)
A single response of the counting system in a radiation counter.
The total number of events indicated by a counter.
(textiles)
The number of warp and filling threads per square inch of fabric.

count

In wire cloth, the number of openings per linear inch.
References in periodicals archive ?
who had been sending his wife to the fertility clinic with his mother, was asked by the fertility expert to undergo tests which established that it was he who had a low sperm count.
Professor Daniel Brison, a University of Manchester expert, said: "The extent of the decline in sperm counts in the Western world revealed in this study is shocking.
Prof Allan Pacey of Sheffield University said to the BBC: 'I ve never been particularly convinced by the many studies published so far claiming that human sperm counts have declined in the recent past.
In our study also, difference in mean FSH levels in patients at 1 year or >5 year follow-up was significant; recovery of normal sperm count at 5-year follow-up compared patients having <1 year follow-up (p <0.
These substances damages the sperm and causes low sperm count.
In more than 90 Percent of cases male infertility is due to either low sperm count or poor semen quality or combination of the two.
These associations with sperm counts suggest that lifestyle changes such as increases in physical activity may positively influence sperm count and concentration in reproductive-age men," the study's authors wrote.
Of those, 4,960 were found to have normal sperm production, and 1,495 had abnormal production, such as low sperm counts.
They found that men who watched TV the most -- 20 or more hours a week -- had a sperm count that was 44 per cent lower than those who watched the least.
These findings are a "serious public health warning," the authors wrote, although they point out the average estimated sperm count is still well above the level deemed normal by the World Health Organization.
According to Tina Jensen, lead author of the study from Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, it cannot be said that it has a causal effect, but other studies have shown that saturated fat intake has shown a connection to other problems and now also for sperm count.
The results indicated that men who ate more saturated fat in their diet had a 41 percent lower sperm count than men who ate less saturated fat.