spherulitic


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spherulitic

[¦sfir·ə¦lid·ik]
(petrology)
Relating to the texture of a rock composed of numerous spherulites. Also known as globular; sphaerolitic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides, the absence of shear and the low cooling rates in rotational molding process favor the coarse, larger, and brittle spherulitic morphology in PP that reduces the impact toughness found in previous research work [64].
When the HLB or the surfactant to water ratio increases, the crystals grow from a few micrometers deep under the surface mortar and adopt a very oriented spherulitic structure.
It occurs interstitially within spherulitic boracite lattice-works as colorless paper-thin crystals.
However, the spherulitic prismatic structures of the Cirratulidae and Sabellidae (Vinn et al.
the original precursor film with normal cooling and thickness of 150 [micro]m) and film drawn to a thickness of 35 [micro]m with low cooling conditions show a typical behaviour of PP of a spherulitic structure with a clear yielding and a strain hardening.
Later, Carter (1990) followed Waller's hypothesis but pointed out that the foliated microstructure could have developed either directly or indirectly through intermediate fibrous prismatic, spherulitic prismatic, or homogeneous grades depending on the groups (Carter, 1990, p.
In the microphotograph on the left of Figure 18, a crystalline formation of spherical symmetry can be observed, which is called spherulitic geometry or structure.
Coarser-grained recrystallized ovoids, which comprise over half the matrix, likely represent relic spherulitic fragments.
at which the morphology changes from spherulitic to non-spherulitic.
Spherulitic morphology disappears on melting, and cooling leads to appearance of lamellar aggregates which are embedded in amorphous polymer.
The morphology of the layers - as determined by optical and scanning electron microscopy - consisted of a featureless, mostly spherulitic first layer, followed by a second layer of smaller size spherulites that continued to decrease in size until a minimum was reached somewhere in the middle of the third layer.