sphincter

(redirected from sphincter control)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to sphincter control: sphincter muscle

sphincter

Anatomy a ring of muscle surrounding the opening of a hollow organ or body and contracting to close it

Sphincter

 

a ringlike muscle that constricts to close a natural orifice such as the oral or anal opening, or to narrow the passage from one part of a hollow tubular organ to another, for example, from the stomach and bile duct to the duodenum and from the bladder to the urethra. The sphincter is always in a tonic state. The orbicular muscle of the iris is a sphincter. Some sphincters consist of striated muscle and others of smooth muscle innervated by the autonomic nervous system.

sphincter

[′sfiŋk·tər]
(anatomy)
A muscle that surrounds and functions to close an orifice.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1993, in connection with a case of a paralyzed veteran brought on Administrative Review, PVA requested VA's Compensation and Pension Service to clarify their rating policy to better define the term "complete loss of anal sphincter control," the "inability to attend to the wants of nature," and "helplessness.
Physiologically, the child must have internal and external sphincter control, rectal flexibility to accommodate stool collection, abdominal strength to pass a bolus of stool, and neurologic integrity both to experience the need to urinate or defecate and to contain it until the time is right, said Dr.
In Kickback, 1959, Dunham finds the smeared paint proof of a loss of sphincter control.
Presentation may involve a number of symptoms that are not seen in other forms of cognitive impairment/dementia: gait disturbances (gait ignition failure, frontal gait disorder, frontal or subcortical disequilibrium), focal deficits, loss of sphincter control, emotional lability (forced laughter, pseudobulbar syndrome), and psychomotor slowing.
In our control-freak culture, dignity means sphincter control.
The FIM assesses the following areas: self-care, sphincter control, transfers, locomotion, communication, and social cognition.
Nor would we consider a clam ileocystoplasty |23~ for patients with UOB because of the lack of sphincter control.

Full browser ?