spikenard


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spikenard

(spīk`närd), name for several plants. The biblical spikenard, or nard, was a costly aromatic ointment, preserved in alabaster boxes, whose chief ingredient is believed to have been derived from Nardostachys grandiflora (or N. jatamansi), a plant of the family Valerianaceae (valerianvalerian,
common name for some members of the Valerianaceae, a family chiefly of herbs and shrubs of temperate and colder regions of the Northern Hemisphere; a few species, however, are native to the Andes.
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 family). Such was the precious box of ointment that Mary Magdalen broke over Jesus' feet. The American spikenard, or Indian root, is Aralia racemosa, of the family Araliaceae (ginsengginseng
, common name for the Araliaceae, a family of tropical herbs, shrubs, and trees that are often prickly and sometimes grow as climbing forms. The true ginseng (Panax ginseng
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 family). The fragrant rhizome of both of these plants is still sometimes used medicinally. The false Solomon's seal, of the family Liliaceae (lilylily,
common name for the Liliaceae, a plant family numbering several thousand species of as many as 300 genera, widely distributed over the earth and particularly abundant in warm temperate and tropical regions.
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 family), is sometimes called wild spikenard. Spikenards are all classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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 but differ in the classes, orders, and families to which they belong.
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spikenard

spikenard

In Valerian family, grows to 3ft (1m), pink bell-shaped flowers. Roots traditionally crushed and distilled for intensely aromatic thick oil that's used as perfume. Root used as sedative, for sleep disorders (like valerian), diuretic, for rashes, skin allergies, anti-fungal, balancing menstrual cycle. Also called Indian Spikenard, Muskroot. SPIKENARD American Spikenard (Aralia racemosa) Red berries in ball clusters. Root is most commonly used for lung problems like asthma, cough, kidney problems, reduce uric acid, syphilis and rheumatism. Also used to shorten labor and ease childbirth. Grows up to 6ft (2m)

spikenard

1. an aromatic Indian valerianaceous plant, Nardostachys jatamans, having rose-purple flowers
2. any of various similar or related plants
3. a North American araliaceous plant, Aralia racemosa, having small green flowers and an aromatic root
4. an aromatic ointment obtained from this plant
References in periodicals archive ?
It had been driven in by Shadforth, commanding officer of the corvette Spikenard during a nail-hammering contest on his last ashore.
It would be absurd to speak Hebrew, that tongue of spikenard and almonds, in such a place.
spikenard Artemisia sagebrush, wormwood Bidens cernua L.
flowering henna and spikenard, spikenard and saffron, cane and cinnamon, with every tree of frankincense, myrrh and aloes, all the rare spices.
Now it is Mary of Bethany, alleged sister of Lazarus, who annoints Jesus' feet with expensive spikenard and wipes them with her hair.
Steinberg has demonstrated the extent to which Christ is depicted as sexed in a wide range of Renaissance images, but there is no tradition that Christ partook, though he was not indifferent to sensuous gratification, such as having his feet rubbed with spikenard and rubbed dry with Mary's hair.
Many of the herbs we are using - such as spikenard, frankincense and myrrh - are referenced in the Bible.
The papal coat of arms adorns the hood, roof and sides and includes the emblem of the Society of Jesus, an eightpointed star symbolizing the Virgin Mary, and a spikenard representing St.
Shade-loving herbs growing there include goldenseal (an important antimicrobial for acute infections, a key medicinal plant of many Native American tribes), bloodroot, downy rattlesnake plantain, Solomon's seal, wild ginger, spikenard, wild yam, black cohosh and blue cohosh.
The synaesthetic image of the tiger, appealing to the senses of both touch and smell, is another instance of multiple coding: imbued with divine attributions in Buddhism, Hindu, and other Indian mythologies, the association of the tiger with the spikenard also brings Christian lore to bear on the poem and helps to explain an otherwise enigmatic image.
In the commentaries of the Early Church Fathers her gospel figure became conflated with a nameless sinner in Luke, who wept on Christ's feet, wiping them with her hair and anointing them with spikenard (7:37-50), and Mary, sister of Martha and Lazarus of Bethany (John, 11-12).
Other essential oils referenced in the Bible that also contain the compound of sesquiterpene are aloes (sandalwood), spikenard, and galbanum.