split flap

split flap

[′split ′flap]
(aerospace engineering)
A hinged plate forming the rear upper or lower portion of an airfoil; the lower portion may be deflected downward to give increased lift and drag; the upper portion may be raised over a portion of the wing for the purpose of lateral control.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Supply, installation, testing, commissioning and operationalisation of led display monitors against replacement of split flap boards of fids at domestic terminal, trivandrum airport
The IP, AC, and FE also determined the safest landing configuration combining the asymmetrical and split flap checklists.
Tenders are invited for Replacement of existing Split Flap type Train display boards with RDSO approved
Tenders are invited for Replacement of existing Split Flap type Train display boards with RDSO approved 5 Line LED type train display boards at KLK JUD RPJ and SIR Railway stations over Ambala division & AMC 2.
The split flap is a cousin to the plain flap, except the only part hinged downward is a panel under the wing's trailing edge; the upper portion of the trailing edge remains in place--only the bottom pivots down, much like a plain flap.
Plain and split flaps create an effective increase in wing area by increasing chord, are reasonably easy to manufacture and are lighter than other designs, but perhaps not as effective.
Replacement of existing Split Flap type Train display boards with RDSO approved Five line LED type train display Boards at Kalka Jagadhari Rajpura & Sirhind Railway stations over UMB Division and AMC.
A split flap situation can come about because of a linkage malfunction deep inside your wing, which no preflight would preclude, or it can be because--especially in the case of a Cessna single--a roller bearing wears just enough to lock up in its track and jams one of your flaps in the down position, while the other one comes up.
Common types include the Fowler flaps of a Cessna 172, slotted flaps of a Piper Cherokee and split flaps of the Cessna 310.
But what about the utility of slips and slipping turns for split flaps, jammed ailerons or a jammed rudder?