squall


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squall

a sudden strong wind or brief turbulent storm

Squall

 

a sudden, brief increase in wind force that is accompanied by changes in wind direction. Wind velocity in a squall often exceeds 20–30 m/sec. A squall lasts several minutes, sometimes with a succession of gusts. Squalls may occur with the approach of storm clouds or clouds preceding atmospheric cold fronts and are often attended by showers, hail, or thunderstorms. Violent squalls can cause great destruction.

squall

[skwȯl]
(meteorology)
A strong wind with sudden onset and more gradual decline, lasting for several minutes; in the United States observational practice, a squall is reported only if a wind speed of 16 knots (8.23 meters per second) or higher is sustained for at least 2 minutes.

squall

A sudden and rapid increase in wind speed by at least two units on Beaufort's scale, which lasts for at least one minute. It is normally associated with cumulonimbus clouds. A squall is indicated by the symbol image on weather charts.
References in classic literature ?
The worst had happened; Juag and I seized paddles and kept the canoe with the wind; but that squall was the parting shot of the gale, which died out immediately after, leaving us free to make for the shore, which we lost no time in attempting.
All that night, while squall after squall smote Berande, uprooting trees, overthrowing copra-sheds, and rocking the house on its tall piles, Sheldon slept.
The first watch, from eight to twelve, was the mate's; and Captain Van Horn, forced below by the driving wet of a heavy rain squall, took Jerry with him to sleep in the tiny stateroom.
The squall of the child went through him like a knife.
The day grew suddenly dark, as a squall obscured the face of the sun.
Everything had happened at once--the blow, the counter-blow, the squeal of agony from the porcupine, the big cat's squall of sudden hurt and astonishment.
It won't be long before that squall is drenching things.
On the 11th of January, 1833, by carrying a press of sail, we fetched within a few miles of the great rugged mountain of York Minster (so called by Captain Cook, and the origin of the name of the elder Fuegian), when a violent squall compelled us to shorten sail and stand out to sea.
Like a sailor shinning up the ratlins during a squall Jerry mounted to his professional seat.
So I was not altogether surprised when the squall foretold by Louis smote me.
It was the bold, clamorous, self-assertive squall of the new human being, who had so incomprehensibly appeared.
The squall had come up, like a spiteful messenger before the morning; there followed in its wake a ragged tear of light which ripped the dark clouds until they showed a great grey hole of day.