squall line


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squall line

[′skwȯl ‚līn]
(meteorology)
A line of thunderstorms near whose advancing edge squalls occur along an extensive front; the region of thunderstorms is typically 12 to 30 miles (20 to 50 kilometers) wide and a few hundred to 1200 miles (2000 kilometers) long.

squall line

A narrow zone of meteorological activity usually parallel or nearly parallel to a cold frontal surface, occurring some distance away. Squall-line activity, or a line squall, is characterized by thunderstorms, heavy rain, brief wind shifts, gusty winds, abrupt pressure rises, and abrupt temperature falls.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a general rule, this does not develop in a squall line unless a break forms in the main line and strengthens, or this segment moves ahead of the line, or if an isolated storm forms ahead of the line.
The November 15 scourge of twisters formed in a squall line, while the November 6 monster descended from a broken line that formed an out-of-season supercell.
With these two modifications, the simulation is significantly improved in the strength of the cold pool, movement of the squall line, the total precipitation produced, and the trailing stratiform precipitation (Fig.
Conway, 1990: The generation and propagation of a nocturnal squall line.
Threading through a squall line moving at 30 knots or more can result in actual weather being 10 miles away from where it's shown to be.
Squall lines can propagate storms well ahead of the line.
The highest winds in a squall line almost always occur before it rains or hails.
We should never be surprised by a squall line or a hot, juicy air mass.
At first glance, appending "windstorm" after squall line may seem redundant given that "squall" implies the presence of strong wind.
1, the only initial kinetic energy in these simulations is in a horizontally uniform wind field; the spectra for the ensemble-mean KE therefore develop from zero along with the growing squall line.
The squall line has a very unusual structure compared to other types of storms; in about 95 percent of them, the updraft will be found on the leading edge of the squall line.
I like to watch a good squall line go through, although I prefer that it not do any damage.