squall line


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squall line

[′skwȯl ‚līn]
(meteorology)
A line of thunderstorms near whose advancing edge squalls occur along an extensive front; the region of thunderstorms is typically 12 to 30 miles (20 to 50 kilometers) wide and a few hundred to 1200 miles (2000 kilometers) long.

squall line

A narrow zone of meteorological activity usually parallel or nearly parallel to a cold frontal surface, occurring some distance away. Squall-line activity, or a line squall, is characterized by thunderstorms, heavy rain, brief wind shifts, gusty winds, abrupt pressure rises, and abrupt temperature falls.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although most squall line tornadoes are relatively weak, they can still kill someone caught unaware.
In many cases, severe thunderstorms in this area occur in a squall line, which is a band of storms that is located usually between 100 and 200 miles ahead of a cold front.
Even after landing, the fun didn't stop; the squall line moved over the field as we taxied to a parking spot.
As it turned out, two squall lines had converged on the carrier.
They can form by themselves (single cell, super cell, or airmass), or in clusters (frontal, squall lines, or mesoscale-convective complexes-MCCs).