squall line

(redirected from squall lines)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

squall line

[′skwȯl ‚līn]
(meteorology)
A line of thunderstorms near whose advancing edge squalls occur along an extensive front; the region of thunderstorms is typically 12 to 30 miles (20 to 50 kilometers) wide and a few hundred to 1200 miles (2000 kilometers) long.

squall line

A narrow zone of meteorological activity usually parallel or nearly parallel to a cold frontal surface, occurring some distance away. Squall-line activity, or a line squall, is characterized by thunderstorms, heavy rain, brief wind shifts, gusty winds, abrupt pressure rises, and abrupt temperature falls.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the past 20 years, meteorologists have chosen to refer to squall lines as mesoscale convective systems (MCSs).
Squall lines by themselves are not tornado producers.
Papers that Chester was most proud of included his study of a prefrontal squall line (1950), work with Harriet on large convective clouds in shear (1959), and a description of the movement of convective storms with J.
The other MCS (B2) was a squall line that was initiated over northern Guangxi in the late afternoon of the previous day, moved southeastward into Guangdong at about 1100 BST 22 May and passed across Guangdong in about 11 h.
2008: Response of simulated squall lines to low-level cooling.
The 2011 QLCS or squall line was characterized by a band of more or less continuous convection along an axis of linear, low-level uplift originally attendant to a cold front.
Simulated squall lines developing in horizontally homogeneous environments are more sensitive to small initial perturbations on scales of 100 km than to larger perturbations on smaller scales.
Typical of continental tropical regimes, there is a strong afternoon peak in convective rainfall; however, nocturnal events are not infrequent and traveling squall lines can arrive in or out of phase with diurnal surface heating (Greco et al.
We should never be surprised by a squall line or a hot, juicy air mass.