squamous

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Related to squamous metaplasia: atypical squamous metaplasia

squamous

[′skwā·məs]
(biology)
Covered with or composed of scales.
References in periodicals archive ?
24) Nevertheless, Ki-67 immunohistochemistry may be a helpful adjunct in separating benign findings (ie, atrophy, squamous metaplasia, fibroepithelial polyps) from HPV-associated lesions and avoiding overdiagnosis.
Microscopic examination showed hyperplastic and hypertrophied Bartholin's gland revealing mild edema, chronic inflammatory infiltrate, and focal dilation of ducts with squamous metaplasia (figure 2).
A final histopathological diagnosis of malignant phyllodes tumour with chondrosarcomatous differentiation and squamous metaplasia was given.
3) Other lesions can present in a similar manner, including fibroadenoma, phylloides tumor, fibrocystic disease with squamous metaplasia and metaplastic carcinoma.
Bladder mucosa (from the base of the fungus ball) manifested chronic inflammation, squamous metaplasia and hyperkeratosis.
These glands have a multitude of functions and can develop a variety of conditions including impaction, rupture, adenitis, squamous metaplasia, and neoplasia of various types, with squamous cell carcinoma the most commonly reported.
In acanthomatous type the central area of follicles often undergo squamous metaplasia with the development of intercellular bridges and keratinisation.
Histological sections revealed fibrocollagenous cyst walls bilaterally, lined by pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium with areas of squamous metaplasia.
Squamous metaplasia was present in 49 (6%) and Pneumonia in 4% cases.
Lack of vitamin A also causes squamous metaplasia, a condition in which the normal pseudostratified, columnar, ciliated respiratory epithelium, which protects the lungs, ears, gut, and most mucous membranes, metamorphoses into squamous cells as on our skin, which doesn't protect these internal structures and can lead to disease.
Smoking is a strong independent risk factor of olfactory impairment (3) probably as consequence of anatomical changes that occur in the olfactory mucosa, such as squamous metaplasia (4) and a reduction in the number and size of the olfactory vessels and cilia (5).