stable

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Related to stables: staples

stable

1
a. the racehorses belonging to a particular establishment or owner
b. the establishment itself
c. (as modifier): stable companion

stable

2
1. (of an elementary particle, atomic nucleus, etc.) not undergoing decay; not radioactive
2. (of a chemical compound) not readily partaking in a chemical change
3. (of electronic equipment) with no tendency to self-oscillation

stable

[′stā·bəl]
(physics)
Not subject to any change without the application of an external agency, such as radiation; said of a molecule, atom, nucleus, or elementary particle.

stable

A building, or portion thereof, for the housing and feeding of horses, cattle, and other domestic animals.
References in classic literature ?
She dressed herself hastily, called the maid, and set off for the stables.
About a quarter of a mile from the stables John Straker's overcoat was flapping from a furze-bush.
On being arrested he volunteered that statement that he had come down to Dartmoor in the hope of getting some information about the King's Pyland horses, and also about Desborough, the second favorite, which was in charge of Silas Brown at the Mapleton stables.
We have, however, examined the stables, and there is nothing to connect him with the affair.
In every other direction the low curves of the moor, bronze-colored from the fading ferns, stretched away to the sky-line, broken only by the steeples of Tavistock, and by a cluster of houses away to the westward which marked the Mapleton stables.
The sun was beginning to sink behind the stables of Mapleton, and the long, sloping plain in front of us was tinged with gold, deepening into rich, ruddy browns where the faded ferns and brambles caught the evening light.
Yes, I hear, I hear, Cap'n," said old John very deliberately, following the young master into the stable.
There was not another mount in the stable for himself and his servant besides Meg and Rattler.
The cap'n's been ridin' the devil's own pace," said Dalton the coachman, whose person stood out in high relief as he smoked his pipe against the stable wall, when John brought up Rattler.
An' to-morrow I'll hustle around to the stables, an' if I locate anything we can rent a shack an' have all winter to think about where we'll go next year.
I say, as I'm ready to wager any man ten pound, if he'll stand out wi' me any dry night in the pasture before the Warren stables, as we shall neither see lights nor hear noises, if it isn't the blowing of our own noses.
When he got up, he was lame and could hardly limp as far as the stable.