stagecoach


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stagecoach,

heavy, closed vehicle on wheels, usually drawn by horses, formerly used to transport passengers and goods overland. Throughout the Middle Ages and until about the end of the 18th cent., the condition of roads in Europe discouraged the use of wheeled vehicles, and travel by land was regularly on horseback. In America until the end of the 18th cent. the traveler often had to make his way on horseback or on foot over a Native American trail. Slow and clumsy stagecoaches were operated irregularly in England and America from the early 18th cent. Stagecoaches first made their 400-mi (643-km) journey between London and Edinburgh in 1785, the time required being 10 days in summer and 12 days in winter. In the same year a stagecoach connection was established between New York City and Albany. Improved roads had made the stagecoach possible, and in turn the stagecoach encouraged the improvement of roads. Stagecoaches varied in design. Typically they were drawn by four or six horses, which were changed at the stages, or stations, along the route, the coach traveling about 12 to 18 hr a day and covering c.40 mi (60 km) a day in summer and 25 mi (40 km) in winter. Breeds of coach horses, e.g., the Cleveland bay and the German coach horse, were developed for strength and speed. The coach had room for eight to fourteen passengers, besides baggage, mail, and the driver. Two of the passengers rode in the seat with the driver; each of the other seats had room for three passengers. To diminish jolting, the body of the coach was supported by two leather straps (the "thorough braces"). The fare varied with time and place, averaging in America about five cents a mile. Competition from mail coaches, established in England in 1784, brought improvements in the comfort, speed, and schedules of stagecoaches, but the great period of the coaches ended in the early 19th cent. as railroads were built.

stagecoach

a large four-wheeled horse-drawn vehicle formerly used to carry passengers, mail, etc., on a regular route between towns and cities
References in periodicals archive ?
Stagecoach is part of the shortlisted bids for three rail franchises (including the two where it is the incumbent).
contacted Stagecoach to find out how many services - and passengers - will be affected by these changes and how they have been calculated, but nobody was available for comment.
However, four different drivers refused to let her on board, and said her annual pass wasn't valid on Stagecoach services.
Contactless payments are already available at Stagecoach Manchester & Wigan, Stagecoach Merseyside and South Lancashire, Stagecoach North East, Stagecoach Oxfordshire, Stagecoach South East, Stagecoach South and Stagecoach Yorkshire.
Jan Krupp purchased the Napa Valley property that would later become Stagecoach Vineyard in 1995.
Phil managing Stagecoach said the savings - even with fuel prices being at their lowest levels for six years - would be enough to cover the entire annual energy costs for a medium-sized house.
Shares in the Perth-based business tumbled by as much as 14% after the earnings warning, despite Stagecoach assuring that it expects the impact on its business to be shortlived.
Stagecoach bus drivers (l-r) Linda Nicholson, Dean nJames, Matt Brown and Nigel Nicholson in their costumes
To date, use of GreenRoad's system and Stagecoach's comprehensive driver training programme has helped deliver a 3% improvement in fuel efficiency across Stagecoach operations in the UK.
Stagecoach already has Britain's lowest bus fares and we are delighted to be able to freeze fares in the north east despite facing ongoing increasing costs.
Stagecoach West Central District First Div - Neilston v Bellshill, Benburb v Port Glasgow, Dunipace v East Kilbride Th, St Roch's v Lesmahagow, Shettleston v Larkhall, Greenock v Lanark, Carluke v St Anthony's.
It was November 1994 that Stagecoach took over from Cleveland Transit, with its acquisition of Hartlepool Transport around the same time.