stall break

stall break

stall breakclick for a larger image
The moment during the execution of the stall maneuver when the aircraft nose comes down as the wing loses lift. To instigate the stall maneuver, the aircraft nose is raised by moving back the control column. This results in a reduction in the speed and the tendency of the nose to drop, thus necessitating further backward movement of the control column. This process is continued until the break takes place. The aircraft is recovered by decreasing the back pressure on the controls and applying full power to accelerate away.
References in periodicals archive ?
But you're not truly in a stall until, in most aircraft, the buffeting warning of stall gives way to the nose pitching down--the stall break.
Maintaining coordinated flight becomes more important, and the stall break itself usually is more enthusiastic.
Depending on the airplane and how it's configured, you may run out of rudder authority before the stall break.
Again, if the stall break occurs in uncoordinated flight, the result often is a spin.
More horribly, since contamination is often distributed unevenly, the stall break will not be typical.
At or near the stall break, large control input can be made--often must be course, the airplane itself likely will contribute some sensations, like buffeting and vibration.
In fact, the way to enter a spin is to add full rudder in the desired spin direction at the moment the stall breaks.
George talks about the stall break being more subtle in a turning stall due to the offset of the elevator force.
As speed bleeds off and the resulting skid achieves a greater rate of turn, the stall break occurs, the airplane snaps over into a spin and there is little altitude with which to recover.
The stall break is more subtle due to the offset of the elevator force.