standard measure

standard measure

[′stan·dərd ′mezh·ər]
(statistics)
References in classic literature ?
So, with a gulf between him and the good company of about a foot in width, standard measure, Mrs Plornish's father was handsomely regaled.
Her appendices of currencies, measures, and weights, of categories of clothiers, and of types of clothing and the standard measure of cloth involved in their making are extraordinarily useful.
Yet the standard measure of quality today, the teaching credential or license, is no sign of quality.
A gigabyte is 1 billion bytes, a standard measure of computer data, but there's an easier way to think of it.
Directly exposed men exhibited higher abnormal sperm morphology than controls and lower ability of sperm to penetrate hamster oocytes, a standard measure of fertility.
GDP is a standard measure of economic activity in a country or reg ion.
Growth in jobs is a standard measure of the state's economy, he said.
When they gave subjects the glucose tolerance test, a standard measure of how well the body processes sugar, they found 326 women had impaired glucose tolerance -- flawed glucose metabolism that leads to Type II diabetes in some cases.
In fact, a case could be made that, in the absence of a standard measure of acceptability, a far more obsessive and byzantine method of cataloging has evolved.
Firewood and stove wood are sold by the standard measure of a cord, or 128 cubic feet of neatly stacked wood.
05 transactions per minute (tpmC) in the test, which was conducted using the Transaction Processing Council's "C" methodology, an industry standard measure of OLTP performance.
The standard measure of class consciousness, which separates actions according to "political" or "economic" motivations, must now include a pinch of ambivalence as well as a dash of moral awareness.

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