star-formation rate

star-formation rate

(SFR) The rate at which stars are formed in a given region, measured in units of solar masses per year. The SFR for the Galaxy is thought to be about 4 solar masses per year, but may be thousands of times higher in starburst galaxies.
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This very distant, relatively typical galaxy is known to us, and we knew it was forming stars, but we had no idea what its real star-formation rate was because there is so much dust surrounding it," study lead author Alexandra Pope, an astronomer at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, said in a (http://www.
Tolleruds team estimates that less than 100 million years ago, the galaxies doubled their star-formation rate.
It is critical to know the star-formation rate in the early universe -- about 10 billion years ago -- because that was the time when most of the universe's stars formed.
In fact, the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) astronomers say its star-formation rate is 45 times lower than what astronomers might expect from such a dense cloud.
In a new study, Shapley and her colleagues have delineated several properties that contribute to the high star-formation rate in the remote Lyman-break galaxies.
Further HTTP-based research led by Michele Cignoni (University of Pisa, Italy) shows that the star-formation rate peaked about 2 million years ago.
Although the pair is currently in a rapid star-forming phase, chances are, if they become satellites of much larger galaxies, this star-formation rate would subside.
From these, their star-formation rate could be then calculated.
To assess the star-formation rate in the clouds, the team homed in on the abundance of carbon atoms stripped of a single electron.
Spirals generally only have enough gas to sustain a "normal" star-formation rate of one to two Suns per year for a few billion years at most.
This would enhance quasar activity, which in turn would influence the star-formation rate in the galaxy's core.
The optical spectrum from VLT and the dust emission detected by ALMA both suggest A1689-zD1's star-formation rate is at least a few times higher than the one-Sun-per-year rate of the Milky Way --not unusual for this cosmic era.