stateless societies

stateless societies

various forms of society which lack a clearly identifiable STATE. Two main senses in which societies may be said to be 'stateless’ can be noted:
  1. all forms of society which existed prior to the formation of the first central states (see PRISTINE STATES);
  2. those forms of society which as well as lacking the kind of clearly identified machinery of statehood (e.g. ‘administrative’ and military support for the leader) also seem to lack all formalized provision for stable leadership – so-called ACEPHALOUS (literally ‘headless’) societies. These forms of society are able to achieve coherence, sustain existence, even conduct warfare, without clearly differentiated state forms either because they are small enough to require no differentiated machinery or because they possess a complex 'segmentary structure’. see SEGMENTARY SOCIETIES. Compare SEGMENTARY STATES.
References in periodicals archive ?
2) For additional exploration into defense and security in stateless societies, see Leeson and Coyne (2014), Block (2014), Cole (2007), and Jasay (2008).
Due to all this, Friedman argues drugs would likely be legal in stateless societies, but ultimately, it is an empirical question.
The Oceanic cases considered here, although dealing with states at their margins, do not describe stateless societies but societies that are deeply state-centric.
Similarly, data from 27 stateless societies studied by modem ethnographers found war deaths averaged 500 per 100,000 people, whereas all deaths from wars, genocides, and man-made famines in modern societies in the 20th century amount to a mere 60 to per 100,000.
is incompatible with anarchism since it gives a select elite power over others', shared religious beliefs that are equally accessible to all can form part of the 'diffuse' sanctions that people use in stateless societies to discourage anti-social behaviour.
Historians and archaeologists have attempted to grapple with the significance of the finds: "Such a concentration of wealth as the metalwork and the beads represent," says Willet, "has been thought to imply some sort of centralised government unlike the stateless societies that characterised Igboland at the time of the first European contacts.
Many stateless societies also populated precolonial Africa; a few encompassed significant numbers of people.
They and their successors were confined to non-Western underdeveloped countries, to stateless societies, to what Joel S.
He reasserts the need for a state - the days of the 'idyllic' politics of stateless societies in Africa are gone forever - but clearly not states as they have so often been.
Chartier devotes another chapter to explaining how stateless societies would respond to non-state aggression.
Because stateless societies invite their own destruction by predatory groups.
Radical libertarians, such as Rothbard (1974, 1978), explicitly acknowledge the historical triumph of governments over primitive stateless societies when they embrace the conquest theory of the origins of the state.