static random-access memory


Also found in: Wikipedia.

static random-access memory

[′stad·ik ′rand·əm ¦ak‚ses ′mem·rē]
(computer science)
A read-write random-access memory that uses either four transistors and two resistors to form a passive-load flip-flop, or six transistors to form a flip-flop with dynamic loads, for each cell in an array. Once data are loaded into the flip-flop storage elements, the flip-flop will indefinitely remain in that state until the information is intentionally changed or the power to the memory circuit is shut off. Abbreviated SRAM.

static random-access memory

(storage)
(SRAM) Random-access memory in which each bit of storage is a bistable flip-flop, commonly consisting of cross-coupled inverters. It is called "static" because it will retain a value as long as power is supplied, unlike dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) which must be regularly refreshed. It is however, still volatile, i.e. it will lose its contents when the power is switched off, in contrast to ROM.

SRAM is usually faster than DRAM but since each bit requires several transistors (about six) you can get less bits of SRAM in the same area. It usually costs more per bit than DRAM and so is used for the most speed-critical parts of a computer (e.g. cache memory) or other circuit.
References in periodicals archive ?
Salzenberg, a programmer, had the wits to test what he paid for, only to find out that the computer's cache - a set of secondary memory chips, or static random-access memory, which stores frequently used data - didn't work.
Leveraging NanoAmp's expertise in memory products, the accelerator works with any combination of static random-access memory (SRAM), Pseudo SRAM (PSRAM) and Flash memory.