steady-state creep

steady-state creep

[′sted·ē ¦stāt ′krēp]
(mechanics)
References in periodicals archive ?
The steady-state creep strain rate at 90[degrees]C is about one order of magnitude higher than the value at 23[degrees]C and the occurrence of the accelerated creep phase and rock failure is also much earlier at higher temperature.
Steady-state creep tests in shear are combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis.
So there is a complex engineering equation, a power law, that plots the expected time to failure based on this secondary steady-state creep with variations for different temperatures and stresses.
In other words: "There is no such thing as steady-state creep.
M] is the viscous element of the Maxwell model, which contributes to the region of the steady-state creep where the viscous flow is the predominant behavior; and the ratio [[eta].
It is shown in [3] that titanium-base dispersion-strengthened materials, produced by electron beam evaporation with subsequent deposition in vacuum, may compete concerning their mechanical properties at 20 [degrees]C and high-temperature strength with dispersion-strengthened titanium alloys, produced by the method of rapid solidification, that is confirmed by data of Figures 1, 2, in which concentration dependence of strength and ductility parameters and rate of steady-state creep at 600 [degrees]C of condensates and alloys, produced by means of rapid solidification, are shown [4-6].
Abstract: This paper presents the application of physically-based, obstacle-controlled creep models to the analysis of steady-state creep rates for eutectic SnPb and seven lead-free solders: Sn58Bi, Sn0.
The steady-state creep rate, [epsilon], could be related to tensile stress ([sigma]) and temperature (T) by the Norton power law:
0] was calculated to provide the best approximation of data at the transition period, but not to ensure the correspondence between experiments and theory for the period of steady-state creep, as in the previous series of experiments.