steady-state current

steady-state current

[′sted·ē ¦stāt ′kə·rənt]
(electricity)
An electric current that does not change with time.
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The resistance of the wire coil controls the amount of steady-state current flowing through the coil and therefore the power the coil consumes when the contacts are closed.
In contrast, LEDs have much lower steady-state current than incandescent lamps, and their initial turn-on current can be much higher for a few microseconds at the beginning of each half-cycle of AC line voltage.
This approach has been reasonable because transport across the channel has been the limiting factor but transport across the source-channel barrier has importance and will eventually limit saturated drain current when channel length becomes very small as scattering theory relates the steady-state current to transmission and reflection coefficients.
The steady-state current depends on pollution of the drive and other factors; the high frequency noise is often induced by a rotor brush sparkling or defective drive bearings.
Manufacturers are required to indicate the steady-state current or power demand on the equipment's nameplate label.
The scientists used the difference between the baseline and the steady-state current to calculate various concentrations of MSG.
This flexibility is the result of the standard's complexity that requires lengthy and complicated testing to address in-rush current, steady-state current, and maintaining voltage to operate the strobe and synchronization.
3 VDC supply with a steady-state current consumption of less than 100 mA (at +30[degrees]C).
Steady-state current at motor starting at no load is equal to 0.
These spikes can be over ten times higher than the magnitude of the steady-state current.