steerage


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steerage

1. the cheapest accommodation on a passenger ship, originally the compartments containing the steering apparatus
2. an instance or the practice of steering and the effect of this on a vessel or vehicle

steerage

[′stir·ij]
(naval architecture)
The least desirable portions of a vessel used for accommodations for passengers who pay the lowest fare.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the discussion about steerage, the committee noted that one concern is that steerage could lead to producers steering consumers with health problems toward certain exchange carriers.
Scarcely 24 hours after being rescued, a group of First and Second Class Titanic survivors formed themselves into a committee, firstly to raise money to help provide for destitute steerage passengers and secondly to reward Captain Rostron and his crew.
In open water, poor steerage isn't a problem because the spinning flagellum creates a flow in the surrounding fluid that directs a bacterium along a straight line.
Put this scenario to a group of seasoned sailors and a mixed bag of responses will no doubt spring to mind--anything from dragging sheets overboard to regain some sort of steerage, to ripping the head door off its hinges to fashion a makeshift rudder.
But today, Good Friday, I wonder what she'd think--this Yankee heretic, two generations from steerage, scribbling by her pond, across from the screened-in porch where afternoons she'd rest, enjoying her peahens' strut and feed.
Ravage set off in steerage for America, one of almost two million Jews who were lured by tales of worldly success.
Miss Dean, her mother and brother were among the first steerage passengers to escape the sinking liner, but Mr Dean was unable to get onto a lifeboat and died in the disaster.
He links the No Child Left Behind Act to the enforcement of inequality and examines the hegemonic logics of the educational assembly line, the creation of an educational steerage class, and the regulation of public consciousness.
There are also occasional errors, either of transcription or of unremarked instances of Iris's eccentricity of spelling (it is hard sometimes to be sure which): "The desserts [sic] of America have their buzzards" (126); "the sperage [2 steerage] son of a steerage mother" (133); a scattering of literals; for example, "complied" (for "compiled"), "blub" for "blurb" (both 156); and occasional failures of sense: "I do not argue with history's verdict that Iris was a distinctly minor poet.
GRAFTON: Packet Punch HOLDENS: Canibal BATEMANS: Summer Swallow PURITY: Pure Gold SPRINGHEAD: Rupert's Ruin TITANIC: Steerage WADWORTH: Henry's IPA WELLS & YOUNGS: Eagle IPA HOOK NORTON: Bitter MILESTONE: Loxley"s Ale NOTTINGHAM: Legend HIGHWOOD: Summer Days
The 148 steerage passengers were placed on an immigrant transfer launch
Marvin Bell understands that it is the interiority of the writer and that of the reader that must meet in the poem: "It's always steerage where they prize a book / and reread it by dim light and puzzle out / the life someone must have lived to have such words.