stereotype


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Related to stereotype: Gender stereotype

stereotype

(stĕr`ĕətīp'), plate from which printing is done, made by casting metal in a mold, usually of paper pulp. The process was patented in 1725 by the Scottish inventor William Ged. Firmin Didot improved the process, named it, and extended its use. Cylinder presses, by which newspapers were traditionally printed, use curved stereotype plates that fit the cylinders. For other applications, stereotype has largely been replaced by electrotype.

stereotype

a set of inaccurate, simplistic generalizations about a group of individuals which enables others to categorize members of this group and treat them routinely according to these expectations. Thus stereotypes of RACIAL, SOCIAL CLASS, and GENDER groups are commonly held and lead to the perception and treatment of individuals according to unjustified preconceptions. See also PREJUDICE.

Stereotype

 

a duplicate of a typeform (type and cuts) used in letterpress printing, consisting of a one-piece plate 2–25.1 mm thick. Stereotypes first appeared in the 18th century and are now widely used to print large numbers of copies. Stereotypes are classified according to the method used to produce them as cast (made of type metal), electrotyped, and molded. They can be made entirely of metal (type metal alone or type metal with a layer of a more durable metal deposited on the printing side) or of polymer (plastics or rubber), or they can be made of a combination of a metal and polymer (metal on the printing side and polymer on the reverse side). The shape of rigid stereotypes—those made of metal or of metal and a polymer—depends on the type of printing press used. Flat stereotypes are used with platen and cylinder presses. Curved stereotypes are used with rotary presses.

stereotype

[′ster·ē·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
A duplicate printing plate made from type and cuts; a paper matrix, or mat, is forced down over the type and cuts to form a mold, into which molten metal is poured, resulting in a new metal printing surface that exactly duplicates the original.
References in periodicals archive ?
This stereotype is used to explain the Kikuyu's success in business and entrepreneurship.
The AA decided to tackle the white van man stereotype on the suggestion of one of its customers, an electrician who felt people like him get a raw deal.
or insisting that [employees] match[] the stereotype associated with
To summarize, a three-way interaction of modern sexism, stereotype activation, and gender-typing on new venture idea evaluation is expected.
Far from balking at the stereotype, Scotland embraced it, with the tartan bunnet with ginger hair hanging out proving a hit.
Basically, a stereotype is a, generalization, or a consensus of members of a group with regard to the attributes of that group or individual (Mooney, Knox, & Schacht, 2004).
com as, "A stereotype is used to categorize a group of people.
A stereotype is 'a fixed, over generalized belief about a particular group or class of people' (Cardwell, 1996).
A host of academic outcomes have been igated as consequences of stereotype threat for women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), including attrition and decreased academic performance.
When a particular behavior by a group member is observed, the viewer evaluates the behavior through the lens of the stereotype.
Stereotype threat refers to the perceived risk of confirming, through one's behavior or outcomes, negative stereotypes that are held about one's social identity.
Benefiting the Inner Door Foundation, the non-profit arm of Royal Oak's Inner Door treatment center, Stereotype is sponsored by the Somerset Collection/Forbes Company and other premier supporters.