stereotype

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stereotype

(stĕr`ĕətīp'), plate from which printing is done, made by casting metal in a mold, usually of paper pulp. The process was patented in 1725 by the Scottish inventor William Ged. Firmin Didot improved the process, named it, and extended its use. Cylinder presses, by which newspapers were traditionally printed, use curved stereotype plates that fit the cylinders. For other applications, stereotype has largely been replaced by electrotype.

stereotype

a set of inaccurate, simplistic generalizations about a group of individuals which enables others to categorize members of this group and treat them routinely according to these expectations. Thus stereotypes of RACIAL, SOCIAL CLASS, and GENDER groups are commonly held and lead to the perception and treatment of individuals according to unjustified preconceptions. See also PREJUDICE.

Stereotype

 

a duplicate of a typeform (type and cuts) used in letterpress printing, consisting of a one-piece plate 2–25.1 mm thick. Stereotypes first appeared in the 18th century and are now widely used to print large numbers of copies. Stereotypes are classified according to the method used to produce them as cast (made of type metal), electrotyped, and molded. They can be made entirely of metal (type metal alone or type metal with a layer of a more durable metal deposited on the printing side) or of polymer (plastics or rubber), or they can be made of a combination of a metal and polymer (metal on the printing side and polymer on the reverse side). The shape of rigid stereotypes—those made of metal or of metal and a polymer—depends on the type of printing press used. Flat stereotypes are used with platen and cylinder presses. Curved stereotypes are used with rotary presses.

stereotype

[′ster·ē·ə‚tīp]
(graphic arts)
A duplicate printing plate made from type and cuts; a paper matrix, or mat, is forced down over the type and cuts to form a mold, into which molten metal is poured, resulting in a new metal printing surface that exactly duplicates the original.
References in periodicals archive ?
1177/0956797617736887) Psychological Science found that "female players outperform expectations when playing men" even though it has previously been suggested that they succumb to "stereotype threat," a psychological phenomenon in which people who are worried about conforming to a negative stereotype experience anxiety and perform worse.
They want people from all walks of life to share their own experiences and concepts of stereotypes on social media using #thisisme.
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Over the last 20 years, the field of aging stereotypes has become an extremely important applied area, given their repercussions in a range of gerontological contexts.
En France, une seule etude compare les stereotypes de la psychose (c.
In order to find out whether or not self-efficacy would act as a mediator across situations, in Study 2 we tested the mediation of self-efficacy in another situation by priming the stereotypes of athlete versus homeless person, using endurance in a physical exercise as our main dependent variable.
The research adds to the growing body of evidence that even slight cues--like reading an article containing a negative stereotype or just remembering a painful instance of being judged unfairly--can have a sizable impact.
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The event considered the prevalence and impact of gender stereotyping in the classroom and followed Chwarae Teg's Gendered Horizons report which showed that not only do children develop gender identities from a very young age but they remain susceptible to gender stereotypes and narrowed career ambitions throughout their school life.
According to social cognitive theory (Bandura, 2002), media play an important role in audiences' stereotypes about people from other countries because many people have no personal contact with people from other countries and rely mainly on mass media for information about them (Harris, 2004).
Country and national stereotypes are tenacious social and psychological constructs.