stern post

stern post

[′stərn ‚pōst]
(naval architecture)
The main member of the after end of a ship, usually upright, running from the keel up to the bottom of the hull.
References in periodicals archive ?
The stern post is mortised in the end of the keel at an angle of approximately 20 degrees (Figure 10).
As the transom moved upward and outward, an opening was created along the trailing edge of the stern post through which the rudder shaft would protrude to the deck and be capped with a tiller for steering.
According to the rule already stated, the forward curve of the stem plus the aft rake of the stern post was approximately equal to the maximum breadth.
He said most of the coins were Portuguese and had been lost by people on board the ship, but one coin had been placed on the keel timber where it met the stern post.
However, latest tests on a stern post found in the area have led experts to believe it came from the Resolution.
A stern post found at Rhode Island was once thought to be from Endeavour, which was renamed Lord Sandwich, and sunk as one of four ships scuttled by the British in 1778 in an attempt to stop the advance of American and French naval forces in the American War of Independence.
Then it was discovered that the ice had wrenched the stern post and the ship was leaking.
Trim projecting lower ends of stem and stern post even with side panels.
With a thin saw, trim even stem or stern post scrap that juts beyond the sides.
In ships, the wood is used for everything from planking and gangways to engine bearers, stern posts, fenders, and sheathing.
The wreck in question was measured some years ago when the stem and stern posts were still visible and found to be a much smaller vessel than the "Scotia".
Spotted gum is used for heavy construction, flooring and shipbuilding, including stems, framing, planking and stern posts.