stimulus filtering

stimulus filtering

[′stim·yə·ləs ‚fil·tər·iŋ]
(psychology)
The apparent awareness of only a few of the great number of stimuli bombarding an animal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with schizophrenia exhibit deficits in this kind of stimulus filtering and thus their brains are probably inundated with too much information.
In a large-scale study involving over 1,800 healthy participants from the general population, Boris Quednow and Georg Winterer examined how far acoustic stimulus filtering is connected with a known risk gene for schizophrenia: the so-called "transcription factor 4" gene (TCF4).
Habituation is important for organisms receiving multiple sensory cues from their environment because it allows for stimulus filtering (Gray, 2005), thus enabling organisms to learn to react only to biologically relevant environmental stimuli (Mankin et al.