stinging cell


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stinging cell

[′stiŋ·iŋ ‚sel]
(invertebrate zoology)
References in periodicals archive ?
They say that mixing stinging cells from sea anemones into skin cream could be a novel approach to painlessly inject drugs into the patients.
New research shows that stinging cells (cnidocytes) in hydra tentacles, which the animals use for self protection and to catch prey, are linked via a simple nervous system to primitive light responsive cells that co-ordinate the animals' feeding behavior.
Next, the residual stinging cells can be removed by using shaving cream or baking soda paste applied to the area and shaving it off with a razor or other blade.
A jellyfish's stinging cells can give you a rash and can even make you very sick.
Known only by its species name, Chrysaora achlyos (kris-AH-oh-rah ACK-lee-us), the creature sported 9-meter (30-foot)-long tentacles riddled with stinging cells called cnidocytes (NYE-doh-sites).
A Red Lion's Mane jellyfish, with 9ft-long tentacles that carry millions of stinging cells, has also been spotted.
In an organism, cells depend on each other to perform various functions and tasks; some cells will produce enzymes, others will store sugars or fat; different cells again will build the skeleton or be in charge of communication like nerve cells; others are there for defence, such as white blood cells or stinging cells in jelly fish and plants.
Anemones and most jellyfish have tentacles with stinging cells.
Among the educational experiences, guests will see how a jelly can devour enough food to double its weight each day, and learn how sea nettles hunt by trailing their long tentacles and frilly feeding arms covered with stinging cells that paralyze prey upon contact.
The blue Catostylus jellyfish do not have a pair of eyes, a heart, a brain or a mouth, but they do have numerous tiny openings on their tentacles and stinging cells which they use to capture their microscopic prey.
In the 1970s, Stanford University biologist Liz Francis found that these structures, called acrorhagi, lash stinging cells onto enemy anemones.
Other favourites include the star sea squirt - a colony of animals where each arm of the star is an individual animal - and the beadlet anemone, which looks like a flower but is actually an animal with around 200 tentacles with stinging cells for catching prey.