stochastic


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stochastic

[stō′kas·tik]
(mathematics)
Pertaining to random variables.

stochastic

stochastic

By guesswork; by chance; using or containing random values.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a non-parametric oriented method with weak hypotheses and a few restrictions, the stochastic dominance theory was suggested by (Fishburn, 1964), which offers a simple tool for selection of risky assets, attracts close attention of scholars from different fields and has been widely used for various research purpose.
Pricing results in the sample case using deterministic, probabilistic and stochastic methods vary widely:
Portier says the mathematics become more difficult when moving from the continuous deterministic approach to the stochastic approach.
Researchers in Germany achieved the first laboratory demostration of stochastic resonance in 1983, finding evidence for the effect in the behavior of an electronic system known as a Schmitt trigger.
The author uniquely unites different types of stochastic, queueing, and graphical networks that are typically studied independently of each other.
The main advantage of stochastic models is that they can deal with certain risks - especially investment and mortality risks - in a relatively rigorous fashion.
Although these results appear dramatic, they should not be surprising to those leading variable annuity writers who are following NAIC developments and have been conducting internal stochastic modeling of their variable annuity business,' said Jeff Mohrenweiser, Senior Director, Fitch and co-author of Fitch's criteria report.
thesis topic and his research at the University of Illinois set the foundation for Berkeley Design Automation's breakthrough stochastic nonlinear circuit analysis technology.
30+ articles arranged in 7 sections address issues from making GARCH work to the future of stochastic volatility option pricing research
Our technical analysts are of the opinion that the stock will move to lower ground as predicted by the most current near-term stochastic numbers.