stone fruit


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stone fruit

[′stōn ‚früt]
(botany)
References in periodicals archive ?
While the season for sought-after domestic stone fruit is short and sweet, thanks to a heightened focus on quality among Southern Hemisphere growers and strategic ripening programs here at home, it's always an exciting time for juicy mangoes, nectarines, peaches, cherries and more.
Excellent value, this blend has bold aromas of stone fruit and oak.
Beta-carotene, the primary form of vitamin A in stone fruits, also may lessen the signs of aging, says a 2016 European Journal of Nutrition study.
Tangy stone fruit, litchi, lime, and fresh herbs come with elegant weight and texture.
A second wine featured for the lamb was a La Forge 2012 which seemed to be the crowd favorite with its spicy intensity and complexity of hawthrone, smoke, sweet floral notes, stone fruit, and an umami, meaty richness.
A review of the standardized Listeria Initiative exposure questionnaire (3) for the Massachusetts patient showed that organic nectarine consumption was recorded, although the form does not specifically ask about stone fruit consumption.
Washington, July 31 ( ANI ): Artist Sam Van Aken has created a single tree that could produce 40 different stone fruits with the help of technique called 'grafting'.
Resiny nose, a little fruit in there, stone fruit, like peaches or apricots," said Andy Schwartz.
The fruit will be imported from Southern Africa, and following its initial crop in 2012, is now a permanent feature in the stone fruit calendar.
Plant parasitic nematodes infest as much as one-third of California's almond and stone fruit acreage (McKenry and Kretsch 1987) and have the potential to compromise all phases of an orchard's productive life by inflicting root damage.
The Central region posted average stone fruit sales of $795 per store per week, a decrease of 5.
Peach is the second most important stone fruit crop of Pakistan.