stopoff

stopoff

[′stäp‚ȯf]
(graphic arts)

stopoff

A material used to limit the spread of solder or brazing filler metal on the surfaces adjacent to the joint.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Some tour locations include a stopoff, where passengers can disembark and pose for photos, such as outside Paul McCartney's childhood home, in Forthlin Road, or at the Penny Lane street sign.
Vossen's time at Boro lasted less than a year, yet the player - now settled in his native Belgium with Club Brugge following a brief stopoff at Burnley - admits he has enough memories stocked away to last a lifetime.
It was the first stopoff for all who fled the Famine or simply wanted to explore the brave new world of America.
Sir Roger was much-loved for his role as the lothario spy from 1973 to 1985 and often took the time to speak to his fans, including during an impromptu stopoff at a Coventry pub.
Tour company managing director Peter Rosenfeld now fears for the future of the port as a stopoff point for liners after another no-show.
Then there is a roundthe-world trip planned, with a stopoff in Borneo to see the orangutans, before visits to Australia, New Zealand and Canada to see family.
Trolling is another option around these towers since they seem to be both a gathering place and stopoff for many gamefish.
Under Nem's rule, Rocinha became a stopoff for Brazilian pop stars, such as Ivete Sangalo and Claudia Leitte, on their tours.
Understandably, the 82-year-old building has become a favoured stopoff for paranormal groups.
The tips are specific and so destination-bound sailors and cruisers, whether via yacht or sailboat, will be the most likely adventurers attracted to this take-along tote, which is a 'must' for any cruiser planning a stopoff or layover in the Virgin Islands.