stream order

stream order

[′strēm ¦ȯr·dər]
(hydrology)
The designation by a dimensionless integer series (1, 2, 3, …) of the relative position of stream segments in the network of a drainage basin. Also known as channel order.
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The stream order of watershed is 1st to 5th order, depicts dendritic type drainage pattern.
Functional feeding classification of aquatic organisms enhances of trophic dynamics in aquatic systems, as aquatic insects derive their nutrition from a spatially and temporally variable system since streams and rivers are characterized by seasonal, local, and stream order differences in inputs, production, and storage of food resources [3].
These examples demonstrate that Giant Burrowing Frogs are capable of using a diverse range of sites to attempt breeding, but breeding opportunities can be highly variable and often limited temporally, being influenced by factors including rainfall (and other meteorological effects), hydrology, geology and stream order.
Finally, it was found that the rate of Light erosion was great in upper stream and decrease toward the outlet, while the heavy erosion appear in downstream, suggesting presence of a clear correlation between the stream order and degree of water erosion, whereas the sheet erosion correlated with Initial orders, while Rill and Gully erosion correlated with major orders.
It is also observed that there is a decrease in stream frequency as the stream order increases.
Identification of the stream order is an essential requirement in the drainage basin analysis as introduced by Horton (1945) and slightly modified by Strahler (1956).
A similar stream-order classification system was also applied, with the smallest unbranched streams on the 1:250000 map sheet classed as first-order streams, and stream order increasing with the number of upstream branches (Hall 1992a: 38-39; Land Conservation Council 1989: 207).
Effort in the fourth stream order was meager, but turtles were likely to encounter our nets in the narrow channel (Fig.
The South Coast Rivers are often of higher stream order (greater channel width) and tend to meander through a flood plain before entering the sea.
Usually, small headwater streams depend upon vegetative input such as leaves, branches, and logs that are deposited from the surrounding watershed, and these inputs are influenced by stream order (8).
Morphometry of benthic macroinvertebrate community structure of the Blackburn Fork drainage as a function of stream order.