strikes


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Related to strikes: lockouts, Illegal Strikes

strikes

temporary stoppages of work by a group of employees in order to express a grievance or enforce a demand (Hyman, 1984).

The strike is a basic sanction possessed by employees, the threat of which plays a large part in INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. However it is typically an act of last resort, and only one of the means by which INDUSTRIAL CONFLICT is expressed. The popular view, particularly in the UK, that strikes are a major problem ignores a number of factors:

  1. consideration of strikes in isolation is liable to mislead as to the overall character of industrial relations;
  2. the number of working days lost as the result of strikes is small compared with those lost as the result of illness or accidents;
  3. strikes vary in character, from brief stoppages to drawn out trials of strength;
  4. discussion of strikes is plagued by definitional and measurement problems. Statistics of strikes record numbers per year, the extent of labour force involvement, working days lost, industrial location, and immediate cause. However international differences in criteria and the unreliability of British data reduce the value of comparisons;
  5. researchers have found it difficult to establish any simple links between the incidence of strikes and economic performance. For all these reasons accounting for the causes and assessing the implications of strikes would seem to involve a degree of complexity little captured by either public discussion or official statistics. There is little doubt that single-factor explanations of strikes (e.g. the presence of agitators, faulty communications, etc.) are inadequate. More satisfactory explanations have considered the range of local and national factors which affect employees’ willingness and ability to undertake strikes, including the actions of employers and governments. See also TRADE(S) UNION, ARBITRATION AND CONCILIATION.
References in classic literature ?
And yet, O King, it seems to me in my folly that it were well to strike the head of the snake and not its tail, for without the tail the head may live, but not the tail without the head.
I'd have had you but for that there lurch, but I don't have no luck, not I; and I reckon I'll have to strike, which comes hard, you see, for a master mariner to a ship's younker like you, Jim.
will you get down to brass tacks and strike a trial balance?
She gave one of her town houses for a Suffrage headquarters, produced one of her own plays at the Princess Theater, was arrested for picketing during a garment-makers' strike, etc.
In response to the country's fear and desperation, politicians began touting "three strikes and you're out" as the solution to the problem of violence.
After a similar law was passed in Ontario, Canada, more strikes and longer strikes resulted, according to a study published in the Journal of Labor Economics.
Very few metropolitan areas have experienced nurses' strikes.
Fitch's concerns about the strike include the possibility of negative cash flow due to working capital build-up, which has been substantial in past strikes; lower revenues and profits at BCA; the impact on other contract negotiations later this year, including the Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace (SPEEA) contract in the fourth quarter; and the impact on general labor relations after a contract is signed.
In Syria, 11 airstrikes were conducted near five areas: Near Al Hawl, three strikes struck two separate ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL vehicle borne improvised explosive device (VBIED), and four ISIL fighting positions Near Ar Raqqah, one strike struck an ISIL tactical unit.
Some people think, I want this as a package and if a court strikes this down, I'm stuck with the stuff I don't like.
Steep competition from low-fare airlines and strikes have also hurt large carriers.
As with all strikes, successful management for RAB members will involve not just some foresight and preparatory work, but a commitment to unity," Berg notes.