strong


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strong

1. (of a colour) having a high degree of saturation or purity; being less saturated than a vivid colour but more so than a moderate colour; produced by a concentrated quantity of colouring agent
2. (of a wind, current, etc.) moving fast
3. (of a syllable) accented or stressed
4. (of certain acids and bases) producing high concentrations of hydrogen or hydroxide ions in aqueous solution
References in classic literature ?
Doctor Strong looked almost as rusty, to my thinking, as the tall iron rails and gates outside the house; and almost as stiff and heavy as the great stone urns that flanked them, and were set up, on the top of the red-brick wall, at regular distances all round the court, like sublimated skittles, for Time to play at.
Knuckle-Bone was a strong man, a very strong man, and he knew not law.
And there is but one way in which a strong determined soul can learn it--by getting his heart-strings bound round the weak and erring, so that he must share not only the outward consequence of their error, but their inward suffering.
He delighted in hearing Hazel Strong talk of Jane, but when he was the subject of the conversation he was bored and embarrassed.
In the struggle for existence, as I have shown, the strong and the progeny of the strong tend to survive, while the weak and the progeny of the weak are crushed and tend to perish.
Gladly," said the Strong Man, his face illuminated with the glory of his thought.
Now that this was changed, and he knew himself to be invested through that old trial with forces to which they both looked for Charles's ultimate safety and deliverance, he became so far exalted by the change, that he took the lead and direction, and required them as the weak, to trust to him as the strong.
So seven thousand waggons of the gold of the whole kingdom were driven up; these the strong man shoved into the sack, oxen and all.
The network that supported the car was made of very strong hempen cord, and the two valves were the object of the most minute and careful attention, as the rudder of a ship would be.
Aunt Plenty says I'm not strong enough for much exercise.
First the great multitude of the weak must go, then the only relatively strong.
John Knightley had really a great regard for his fatherinlaw, and generally a strong sense of what was due to him; but it was too often for Emma's charity, especially as there was all the pain of apprehension frequently to be endured, though the offence came not.