study

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study

1. a drawing, sculpture, etc., executed for practice or in preparation for another work
2. a musical composition intended to develop one aspect of performing technique
3. Theatre a person who memorizes a part in the manner specified

study

A drawing executed as an educational exercise, produced as a preliminary to a final work or made record observations.
See also: Design drawing

study

1. A room or alcove of a house or apartment used primarily as a place for reading, writing, and study. It often embodies the features of a private office and private library.
2. A preliminary sketch or drawing to facilitate the development of a design.
References in periodicals archive ?
Melendez dreams of the day when academics will work to make sure that "young people of color know the importance of studying sexuality, that it's not just fun and games, but that it deals with really important issues that are of concern to many communities of color" such as HIV/AIDS, intimate partner violence, pregnancy and birth control, the rights of same-gender loving individuals, and sexual agency and the right to pleasurable experiences.
studying in quiet places, selecting specific strategies to obtain desired goals, being efficacious about capabilities) are more likely to exert greater effort in their academic endeavors (Zimmerman, 1998).
Basic researchers have used clinical and neurochemical observations from humans to develop of animal models of schizophrenia and are now studying some of the exposures implicated in epidemiology using the same techniques.
Clearly a model of how delay arises is useful in studying what is undoubtedly not a unitary phenomenon.
The Project is studying how this affects criminal behavior.
By studying the chemistry of dense interstellar clouds, astronomers expect to gain a better understanding of how these clouds collapse to form stars and, perhaps, planetary systems.
This strategy of broadly studying exposure without an identified health outcome is atypical in public health studies--perhaps because health officials are uncomfortable dealing with the uncertain action implications of reporting on exposure without an established tie to health--but it has received strong scientific and public interest (e.
Many discussions and studies have been published on the difficulties that non-native English-speaking students encounter while studying at American universities and using American academic libraries (Wayman, 1984; Ball & Mahoney, 1987; Macdonald & Sarkodie-Mensah, 1988; Allen, 1993; Jiao & Onwuegbuzie, 1997; Zoe & DiMartino, 1996; Onwuegbuzie & Jiao, 1997; Liu & Redfern, 1997).
Besides studying the feasibility of secession, the study represents the first time the city of Los Angeles has had such a comprehensive portrait of its assets and departments.