Stump


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Related to Stump: stump up

stump

1. the base part of a tree trunk left standing after the tree has been felled or has fallen
2. Cricket any of three upright wooden sticks that, with two bails laid across them, form a wicket (the stumps)
3. a short sharply-pointed stick of cork or rolled paper or leather, used in drawing and shading
4. on the stump Chiefly US and Canadian engaged in campaigning, esp by political speech-making

Stump

 

the part of an organ left after an amputation or operation (for example, stump of the stomach or uterus). The term is also applied to the remainder of a transected nerve or a removed appendix. It is most often used for the part left after the amputation of a limb.

After an amputation, some patients may have a false sensation (”phantom sensation”) of a nonexistent limb or part—for example, a hand or foot—or of pain in the limb (”phantom pains”). Diseases of the stump—such as wounds, fistulas, osteomyelitis, and eczema—require special treatment and sometimes a second amputation (reamputation). Defects of a stump that hinder the normal wearing of a prosthesis include too long or too short a stump, a conical stump, excess skin, contractures, and ankylosis. For a prosthesis to fit properly, the stump must be free of pain and have healthy skin and strong muscles, and the surviving joints must be able to move freely.


Stump

 

one of the basic tools in crayon drawing; it may also be used for drawings done in pencil, charcoal, or pastel. A stump is a short roll of paper or suede cut to a point and used to rub down the strokes of a drawing on paper, cardboard, or canvas. The tool produces shading effects.

stump

[stəmp]
(mining engineering)
A small pillar of coal left between the gangway or airway and the breasts to protect these passages; any small pillar.
References in classic literature ?
Suddenly it flashed upon his recollection that this was the stump of Liberty Tree
The youth fired with great rapidity, but no motion was made by the turkey; and, when the examiners for the ball returned from the “mark,” they declared that he had missed the stump.
He slapped old friends on the back and asked them if the stumps were coming away easily; he talked nonsense concerning labor and the inalienable rights of elephants to a long "nooning"; and, wandering to and fro, he thoroughly demoralized the garden till sundown, when he returned to his picket for food.
Yet all the while his stump of tail valiantly bobbed back and forth, and, when released from such blissful contact, his silky ears flattened back and down as, with first a scarlet slash of tongue to cheek, he seized her hand between his teeth and dented the soft skin with a love bite that did not hurt.
He continued his plodding pursuit, though once, for the moment baffled, he came to a full stop and blinked at the men who looked on, at the same time wagging his stump of a tail as an expression of his willingness to fight.
Throwing away the stump of a cigar, the planter rose, saying: "I forgot to tell Andrew about those horses.
There was a yellow and withered stump some way off, seen under the drooping branches of a lofty oak.
Or I was attracted by the passage of wild pigeons from this wood to that, with a slight quivering winnowing sound and carrier haste; or from under a rotten stump my hoe turned up a sluggish portentous and outlandish spotted salamander, a trace of Egypt and the Nile, yet our contemporary.
Now when he was not hindering her, she knew what to do, and without looking at what was under her feet, and to her vexation stumbling over a high stump into the water, but righting herself with her strong, supple legs, she began making the circle which was to make all clear to her.
In the smoking-room of Lady Wetherby's house, chewing the dead stump of a once imposing cigar, Dudley Pickering sat alone with his thoughts.
Not, however, towards the 'shops' where cunning artificers work in pearls and diamonds and gold and silver, making their hands so rich, that the enriched water in which they wash them is bought for the refiners;--not towards these does Mr Wegg stump, but towards the poorer shops of small retail traders in commodities to eat and drink and keep folks warm, and of Italian frame-makers, and of barbers, and of brokers, and of dealers in dogs and singing-birds.
I once prevailed on the barber to give me some of the suds or lather, out of which I picked forty or fifty of the strongest stumps of hair.