stutter

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stutter

[′stəd·ər]
(communications)
Series of undesired black and white lines sometimes produced when a facsimile signal undergoes a sharp amplitude change.
(medicine)
A speech disorder marked by repetition of words, syllables, or sounds, or by hesitations in manner by the speaker.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several types of disfluencies such as repetitions, prolongations, and blocks characterize stuttered speech.
Establishing whether or not Cervantes stuttered requires overcoming two major obstacles.
Equally important is the fact that Inchbald and van Swieten consider the body's location in space as well as the spaces of the body as critical details in the representation of human speech, stuttered or not.
In her seminal study, Fransella (1972) conducted personal construct therapy with 16 adults who stuttered, using repertory grids and bi-polar implications grids to assess the relationship between meaningfulness of speaker roles (i.
They found that compared with a matched group of fluent speakers, people who stuttered had slower visual reactions times, less accurate visual tracking abilities, and impaired visual perception.
The group was categorized into three subgroups: normal fluent controls (seven), children who showed persistent stuttering (eight), and children who previously stuttered but had recovered and had been fluent for at least 2 years prior to scanning (seven).
The group was subcategorized into normal fluent controls (seven), children who showed persistent stuttering (eight), and children who previously stuttered but had recovered for at least 2 years prior to scanning (seven).
In the original evaluation of RB, Azrin and Nunn (1974) examined 14 people who stuttered, 13 of whom had previously received unsuccessful stuttering treatment.
Researchers from various organisations, including the University of Sydney, studied 54 children aged three to six in New Zealand who had all been diagnosed with a frequency of at least 2% of syllables stuttered.
He has lived with the problem since he was a child and did not meet another person who stuttered until his mid-twenties.
Stop" contingent on stuttered words and "Good" contingent on fluent utterances)
This suggests that chronic stutterers were taught (by themselves or others) to become frightened, ashamed, and guilt ridden when they stuttered and as a result attempted to avoid these feelings by avoiding stuttering, creating the vicious cycle called "stuttering.