stylus

(redirected from stylar)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

stylus:

see penpen,
pointed implement used in writing or drawing to apply ink or a similar colored fluid to any surface, such as paper. Various kinds of pens have been used since ancient times.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Stylus

 

a writing instrument in the form of a pointed rod of bone or metal used in Greek and Roman antiquity and in the Middle Ages. The Greeks and Romans wrote with styli on wooden tablets covered with wax; scratches were made through the wax when writing. Erasures were made with the unpointed end, which was spade-or ball-shaped. The name of the instrument gave rise to the abstract concept of style, which in antiquity came to mean literary style and later acquired a number of other meanings.

stylus

[′stī·ləs]
(computer science)
The pointed device used to draw images on a graphics tablet.
(engineering acoustics)
The portion of a phonograph pickup that follows the modulations of a record groove and transmits the resulting mechanical motions to the transducer element of the pickup for conversion to corresponding audio-frequency signals. Also known as needle; phonograph needle; reproducing stylus.
(graphic arts)
A rather blunt metal point sometimes used in painting to make lightly ruled lines.

stylus

1. a pointed instrument for engraving, drawing, or writing
2. a tool used in ancient times for writing on wax tablets, which was pointed at one end and blunt at the other for erasing mistakes
3. a device attached to the cartridge in the pick-up arm of a record player that rests in the groove in the record, transmitting the vibrations to the sensing device in the cartridge. It consists of or is tipped with a hard material, such as diamond or sapphire

stylus

(1) A pen-shaped instrument that absorbs current and is used with the capacitive touchscreens on smartphones and tablets. The correct plural word for stylus is "styli", pronounced "sty-lie;" however, most people say "styluses." See Surface Pen, Apple Pencil, stylus pen and touchscreen.

(2) A pen-shaped instrument that is used to "draw" images or select from menus on resistive touchscreens that react to pressure. See touchscreen.


PDA Styli
A stylus was used on old Palm PDAs, which required pressure on the screen to operate. It was included with every Palm organizer (see PalmPilot).







(3) The needle part of a phonograph cartridge, which typically contains a diamond tip. The stylus rides in the grooves of the phonograph record, picking up the vibrations carved into the vinyl, and is attached to a cantilever arm with a magnet or coils at the other end (see phono cartridge). A wide variety of cartridge styles have been used over the years, and there are a huge number of replacement styli available on the market. For more information, visit Jerry Raskin's Needle Doctor at www.needledoctor.com.


When Needles Were Needles
The steel needles at the top were used in old Victrola 78 record players like the unit underneath. They were later replaced with sapphire tips to last longer. The "needle" name obviously came from the long shape of the first styli. (Top image courtesy of Jerry Raskin's Needle Doctor, www.needledoctor.com)


When Needles Were Needles
The steel needles at the top were used in old Victrola 78 record players like the unit underneath. They were later replaced with sapphire tips to last longer. The "needle" name obviously came from the long shape of the first styli. (Top image courtesy of Jerry Raskin's Needle Doctor, www.needledoctor.com)







A Modern Stylus
The stylus on this Grado magnetic phono cartridge is diamond tipped. Vibrating in the vinyl record's groove, the stylus transfers the oscillations to the cantilever and magnets. (Image courtesy of Grado Laboratories, www.gradolabs.com)
References in periodicals archive ?
indicating that stylar barriers are incomplete in some cases.
The inner epidermis of the stigma in continuity with the stylar canal, as far as the inner epidermis of the ovary, consists of elongated papillary cells (Figures 5b-c and 6b, f).
Late in the process of scoring cleared ovules at 24 HAP, it became evident, in some less-than-optimally-cleared tissue samples, that the remnants of pollen tubes could frequently be observed in the basal stylar canal near the micropyle.
Pollen tubes from the two lobes on a stigma grow down opposite walls of the stylar canal for the majority of the way to the ovary (at least to the point at which the stylar arms fuse; S.
2] individuals of in vivo pollen-tube germination and elongation into the stylar columns supports this assumption.
Psychine stylosa fruits are wider than high, with the pair of outstretched chartaceous wings forming a semicircular margin to the lower half of the fruit, but obtusely cleft apically, with a persistent elongate stylar extension equal to the length of the fruit and a stout pedicel, shortly stipitate.
Brush tripping mechanisms, in which the pollen is transported out of the keel by the aid of the stylar hairs, occur in Phaseolus and other unrelated genera such as Lathyrus, Pisum, Vicia, and Lens (Kalin-Arroyo, 1981).
Thus, it appears that some inbreeding and outbreeding depression occurs during early embryo development, and/or that prezygotic stylar discrimination occurs against inbred and widely outbred crosses (see Waser et al.
1987) have suggested that pollen-tube growth may be affected by the genetic relatedness between the pollen and stylar tissue resulting in discrimination against matings between related individuals.
The first type has truncate stylar branches (Ameghinoa Speg.