Subgenus

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Subgenus

 

a taxonomic category of plants and animals immediately below a genus. A subgenus braces a group of species that are most closely related to one another within a genus but that do not differ so much from other species or groups of species of the genus as to constitute a separate genus. A subgenus may be represented by a single species. The plant genus Astragalus contains several subgenera, including Phaca, Caprinus, and Tragacantha. In animal taxonomy, the genus Mustela includes the subgenera Lutreola, Putorius, and Mustela. The type subgenus repeats the name of the genus. The name of the subgenus is placed in parentheses after the genus name; for example, Mustela (Putorius) eversmanni is the Siberian polecat.

References in periodicals archive ?
The mantle mites appear to be a conglomerate of diverse taxa at the subgeneric level, with some subgenera having morphological affiliations with sponge mites, and others sharing morphological similarities with gill mites (Vidrine 1996, Edwards et al.
No hybrids between the two subgenera have yet been reported and this adds further evidence that the two subgenera are naturally distinct (Krahulec et al.
It should be noted that the species taxonomy in this study was based on the new taxonomy of Perez Farfante & Kensley (1997) who raised the status of five subgenera (Farfantepenaeus, Fenneropenaeus, Litopenaeus, Marsupenaus, and Melicertus) of Penaeus to full genera (see also ITIS 2007).
Since then, over 120 nominal species were incorporated into Rivulus, some subgenera were described, and some species groups were diagnosed (e.
The relationships between species in the other two unresolved groups are not as clear because the subgenera of the members differ.
A few other, more poorly known species of subgenera Nematonurus, Chalinura, and Lionurus, inhabit mostly the fringes of the abyss elsewhere.
This same study noted tori in wood of two of three subgenera of Wikstroemia, a sister genus to Daphne.
By 1898, Jordan and Evermann grouped the 55 northeast Pacific species that they recognized into 13 subgenera (Jordan and Evermann, 1898).
Although not subdivided into subgenera, the genus is separated into two major groups-the slowgrowing organisms that require seven days or more to yield visible colonies and the rapid growers, whose colonies are discernible in less than seven days.
The Palaearctic genus Dorcadion Dalman, 1817, which belongs to the subfamily Lamiinae, has 5 subgenera, i.
1a) and has no accessory pale spot sector as in Cellia, Lophopodomyia, Kerteszia and Nyssorhynchus subgenera.
Franklin (1913) provided one of the earliest accounts of bumble bees in Texas and listed the following seven species and subgenera for the state, B.